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Canadian Red Cedar Greenhouse!

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  • #76
    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
    We got a month of snow, 24-30", over 2 days. I really need to sulk in a greenhouse now.
    Yours appears ideal for a 7 day camp out.
    LOL! You should buy one and hire someone to put it together. Without staining it, a three day weekend and it could be up. You said you needed one.
    Enable! Enable!

    Comment


    • #77
      Think it needs to wait. Mountain blizzard from left to right at home, zero visibility and wet snow sticking to the windows.

      I'd be happy to rent a bed & bath in a green house full of plants in the winter. 7-14 days. Cater my meals because I'll
      be so busy with projects (wearing a T-shirt and shorts.) I guess with a greenhouse, it would be a plan to get dressed in a basement, if it had one!

      I have space for maybe 12' x 30' but plumbing would be a puzzle.

      Comment


      • #78
        We have a nice one. Having a chair inside is nice in the winter time. Outside cold while inside is balmy.

        Comment


        • #79
          Hello

          this is a very nice greenhouse. I have a question about the wood: is there any difference between the Canadian Red Cedar and the Western Red Cedar?

          I already carved Western Red Cedar, which can be carved very badly across the grain. Can the Canadian Red Cedar be carved better?

          Thank you for an answer.

          Jakob

          Comment


          • #80
            Hello Jakob:
            I have been carving Western Red Cedar for many years. It is all Thuja plicata.

            WRC grows in a wide band all along the west coast from Oregon to Alaska.
            There is another north/south band along the west slope of the Rocky Mountains.
            I live in the Interior Cedar Hemlock zone in the mountains in McBride, BC.

            If the WRC can grow very fast then the growth rings are wide and soft. That carves very badly.

            The next time you look at WRC, take a ruler with you. Measure/count the number of growth rings per 25mm ( inch).
            Less than 15 rings may look nice but it's too soft even with very sharp edges, to carve. It just crushes.
            Good carving WRC has a ring count of 20-40 rings per 25mm. More >50, is hard but still carves well.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
              Think it needs to wait. Mountain blizzard from left to right at home, zero visibility and wet snow sticking to the windows.

              I'd be happy to rent a bed & bath in a green house full of plants in the winter. 7-14 days. Cater my meals because I'll
              be so busy with projects (wearing a T-shirt and shorts.) I guess with a greenhouse, it would be a plan to get dressed in a basement, if it had one!

              I have space for maybe 12' x 30' but plumbing would be a puzzle.
              You sound like me. Really easy to please.
              12 x 30 feet isn’t much to deal with but you can still dream. Lol.

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by lionslair View Post
                We have a nice one. Having a chair inside is nice in the winter time. Outside cold while inside is balmy.
                A chair for this greenhouse was my Christmas wish but it didn’t happen but I’ll get one soon enough. I so wish to carve in it during the cooler months. They are so nice.

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by Tasmandevil View Post
                  Hello

                  this is a very nice greenhouse. I have a question about the wood: is there any difference between the Canadian Red Cedar and the Western Red Cedar?

                  I already carved Western Red Cedar, which can be carved very badly across the grain. Can the Canadian Red Cedar be carved better?

                  Thank you for an answer.

                  Jakob
                  Hi Jakob

                  To be honest I’ve never carved western red cedar. This was a greenhouse kit I bought, stained and put together but I do know that western cedar is just that; cedar from the west. Canadian western cedar mainly comes from British Columbia
                  and is considered some of the worlds best red cedar.

                  I saw an earlier post of yours stating that you just moved and were looking for some wood sources and suggestions. My suggestion is to just try different wood to see how you like it. You might even consider putting in an ad on kijiji or a similar place that offers advertisements. Sometimes people offer free wood for clean up and removal.

                  From what I’ve read and understand , cedar is a lovely soft wood to carve. Red cedar has extra oil in it that offers rot & mould resistance, it doesn’t warp or shrink too readily and it has a wonderful aromatic scent which adds to the enjoyment of working with it.
                  I’d say it’s well worth trying.

                  White cedar is a great wood to carve and has gorgeous grain patterns. It’s mainly found out east. Bruce, from here, often carves from it.


                  https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/get-more/cedar

                  https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...-to-carve-with

                  https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...-carving-cedar

                  https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...62-white-cedar

                  https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...od-for-carving

                  https://www.ehow.com/how_5689827_carve-cedar-wood.html

                  http://hingstssignpost.blogspot.ca/2...cedar.html?m=1

                  https://www.westwindhardwood.com/pro...carving-woods/

                  This is a wood spirit carved from aromatic cedar.

                  http://www.thewoodcarverscabin.com/w...a-wood-spirit/

                  Good luck !

                  Last edited by Spiritwolfe; 02-14-2018, 03:34 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Hey Nikki.... I built a green house this summer too and am looking forward to using it this spring...when we have -30 outside the coldest it has been inside in -10...

                    The back wall in 4ft in the ground and the front wall 2 ft. It is 12 x 32 and covered inside and out with greenhouse plastic. The back wall is filled with stones for a heat sink. It is filled with soil to plant right into the ground inside as well as being able to start my plants in there in the spring...

                    g2.jpgg1.jpg

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Lisa Chemerika View Post
                      Hey Nikki.... I built a green house this summer too and am looking forward to using it this spring...when we have -30 outside the coldest it has been inside in -10...

                      The back wall in 4ft in the ground and the front wall 2 ft. It is 12 x 32 and covered inside and out with greenhouse plastic. The back wall is filled with stones for a heat sink. It is filled with soil to plant right into the ground inside as well as being able to start my plants in there in the spring...

                      g2.jpgg1.jpg
                      Lisa, Lisa! Well I’ll be darned. You built the kind of greenhouse I originally wanted. It’s build with the frost line in mind where I couldn’t do that due to our septic system. Where I wanted my greenhouse was where the septic pipes were so I couldn’t dig down 4 feet which is what I preferred . I found this sweet set up and was content with it.

                      I’m so glad you finally joined. This place is great.

                      Questions:
                      1/. Are these your own plans or did you find or purchase plans somewhere?
                      2/. What type of wood did you use?
                      3/. Where did you get the stones from?
                      4/. Did you purchase custom poly sheets?
                      5/. What mm of thickness is the poly?
                      NOTE: on another glance , it looks like you just used plastic sheets.
                      6/. Is the heat sink wall facing north?
                      7/. Any particular reason why you painted it silver?
                      8/. What are you planning on growing?


                      That’s a great greenhouse Lisa but I must admit, mines much prettier.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Nikki. yes for sure, yours is much prettier!...

                        1. I made up this plan after looking at the site I had, and the use I wanted it for.
                        2. it is 2 x 6 treated lumber and ply painted white.
                        3. the stones were all from the hole I dug...we have no shortage of them...
                        4. the poly is a woven green house poly sheet from Northern Greenhouses here in MB. You can order the width and length you want by mail...excellent service...
                        5. the woven poly is 11ml
                        6. the back wall faces north.
                        7. the woven poly is opaque but looks silver in the pictures,,, the ends are screen with auto openers above the door. After this picture I made panels of the woven poly to cover the screen ends for cooler temps.
                        8. I have plans to grow tomatoes, peppers, greens, broccoli cauliflower and cabbage, things that need protection from insects, and things that need a longer growing season. I plan to start all of my hanging pots for the yard in there as well so I don't have my grow op taking up my shop space for a few months in the spring.

                        OUR SUPERSTRONG WOVEN POLYS

                        Easy Info Locator: See back cover for page #s of prices, products, articles, photos!

                        WOVEN POLY ADVANTAGES:

                        WOVEN POLY IS LOWER IN COST THAN GLASS OR FIBERGLASS & LIGHTER & EASIER TO INSTALL.

                        LIGHT PROPERTIES: Our 11 mils Superstrong “Clear” (translucent) Woven Poly gives 100% light diffusion,

                        scattering and refracting the light, causing it to come from all directions, reducing shadows, eliminating spots of overintense

                        heat, and providing more uniform light, all of which reduces plant stress, making it ideal for growing stocky

                        “non-leggy” plants. 11 mils Superstrong “Clear” (translucent) oly is best for plants.

                        LONGEVITY: See our conditional pro-rated warranty on page 6. Clear sunny skies are hard on poly. The UV

                        inhibitors in our poly protect it, normally enabling it to last 3-4 years or more, even on the sunny south side of a

                        properly ventilated structure. On well ventilated structures, especially in cloudy or shady areas, many get 7-10 years

                        from our poly. The record is 18 years. Pages 6 & 11 outlines some keys to extending poly life.

                        STRENGTH: Our woven poly can be used in virtually any climate. It resists hailstones, gale-force winds, snow

                        loading, cat and bird claws, and stones. The toughness is due to the weave, and thickness.

                        TEAR RESISTANCE: It's tough! Test it yourself! Puncture a hole into the middle of your sample and try to make

                        the hole expand. You'll find it's very tough.

                        HEAT RESISTANCE: The dense weave of our poly helps to reduce hot weather stretching/sagging.

                        RESISTANCE TO COLD-CRACKING: Resilience down to minus 100 degrees F.
                        Last edited by Lisa Chemerika; 02-15-2018, 12:01 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          From #83: Nikki: I've carved almost nothing but western red cedar for many years.
                          If you don't do a ring count to find good wood, you're wasting your time and money.
                          I've done exactly that. And I'm old enough to admit it.

                          I promise that if I sulk in your WRC greenhouse, I will refrain from carving the frame posts.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Lisa Chemerika View Post
                            Nikki. yes for sure, yours is much prettier!...

                            1. I made up this plan after looking at the site I had, and the use I wanted it for.
                            2. it is 2 x 6 treated lumber and ply painted white.
                            3. the stones were all from the hole I dug...we have no shortage of them...
                            4. the poly is a woven green house poly sheet from Northern Greenhouses here in MB. You can order the width and length you want by mail...excellent service...
                            5. the woven poly is 11ml
                            6. the back wall faces north.
                            7. the woven poly is opaque but looks silver in the pictures,,, the ends are screen with auto openers above the door. After this picture I made panels of the woven poly to cover the screen ends for cooler temps.
                            8. I have plans to grow tomatoes, peppers, greens, broccoli cauliflower and cabbage, things that need protection from insects, and things that need a longer growing season. I plan to start all of my hanging pots for the yard in there as well so I don't have my grow op taking up my shop space for a few months in the spring.

                            OUR SUPERSTRONG WOVEN POLYS

                            Easy Info Locator: See back cover for page #s of prices, products, articles, photos!

                            WOVEN POLY ADVANTAGES:

                            WOVEN POLY IS LOWER IN COST THAN GLASS OR FIBERGLASS & LIGHTER & EASIER TO INSTALL.

                            LIGHT PROPERTIES: Our 11 mils Superstrong “Clear” (translucent) Woven Poly gives 100% light diffusion,

                            scattering and refracting the light, causing it to come from all directions, reducing shadows, eliminating spots of overintense

                            heat, and providing more uniform light, all of which reduces plant stress, making it ideal for growing stocky

                            “non-leggy” plants. 11 mils Superstrong “Clear” (translucent) oly is best for plants.

                            LONGEVITY: See our conditional pro-rated warranty on page 6. Clear sunny skies are hard on poly. The UV

                            inhibitors in our poly protect it, normally enabling it to last 3-4 years or more, even on the sunny south side of a

                            properly ventilated structure. On well ventilated structures, especially in cloudy or shady areas, many get 7-10 years

                            from our poly. The record is 18 years. Pages 6 & 11 outlines some keys to extending poly life.

                            STRENGTH: Our woven poly can be used in virtually any climate. It resists hailstones, gale-force winds, snow

                            loading, cat and bird claws, and stones. The toughness is due to the weave, and thickness.

                            TEAR RESISTANCE: It's tough! Test it yourself! Puncture a hole into the middle of your sample and try to make

                            the hole expand. You'll find it's very tough.

                            HEAT RESISTANCE: The dense weave of our poly helps to reduce hot weather stretching/sagging.

                            RESISTANCE TO COLD-CRACKING: Resilience down to minus 100 degrees F.
                            Thanks Lisa. That’s a great plan you chose and well executed. Yours might look as pretty as mine but it’s probably more practical. I love the heat sink wall idea. That’s an awesome idea. The woven poly is very interesting also.
                            I grew all kinds of veggies also and it was really fun.
                            Looking forward to seeing your greenhouse in action this summer. Well done.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
                              From #83: Nikki: I've carved almost nothing but western red cedar for many years.
                              If you don't do a ring count to find good wood, you're wasting your time and money.
                              I've done exactly that. And I'm old enough to admit it.

                              I promise that if I sulk in your WRC greenhouse, I will refrain from carving the frame posts.
                              Thanks RV. I’ll keep this in mind and ok you can come and sulk in my greenhouse as long as you don’t carve it. Lol

                              Comment

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