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  • Carving in Public Places

    My Frien's, I might have been doing too much woodcarving in public. I use this, often, as a distraction for long waits at medical facilities.

    A couple of weeks ago, ~ I went to the pharmacy. ~ at Ferrell-Duncan Clinic, ~ and was immediately asked where's your carving?"

    Last week, I walked up to the reception desk, ~ at the Clinic, ~ for my bi-annual appointment with my Urologist, ~ and was greeted with, "What carving have you got with you today?"

    I was later escorted to the exam room ~ Dr. Trinca walked in, ~ shook my hand, ~ looked around ~ asked, "Where's the carving you are working on?" ~ before he got around to asking, "How have you been doing health wise?"

    After my visit ~ I went to his secretary's desk to set up my next appointment date. She greeted me with, ~ I don't remember your name, ~ but you are the woodcarver. She continued with, either I have been working here too long ~ or you have been coming here too long. I suspect both! I preempted, "Where's your carving?" by explaining my woodcarving status.

    I assured all of them that I had not given up woodcarving. It's simply that all of the pieces I currently have underway are in the finishing stages that cannot be done in public.

    I do ~ appreciate their enjoyment of my carving efforts, ~ I intend to have at least one carving underway ~ at all times, ~ that can accompany me on my too frequent journeys into the medical arena.


  • #2
    Paul, you are building yourself a legend---carver and writer, hunky-dory
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Paul - My late wife spent many days in the hospital. To fill the waiting time I would do some carving - usually outdoors near the entry lobby. People would sometimes stop to look, or ask questions. My mind must not have been focused on the carving because I cannot remember what pieces I did at the time.

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      • #4
        As the old saying goes, I resemble that remark!"

        Bob L

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        • #5
          Very good story, Paul! You've built yourself a legacy!
          Keep On Carvin'
          Bob K.

          My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


          My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


          My RWK Woodcarving Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwkwood


          My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

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          • #6
            Nice story, and you have indeed built a reputation. I just have one question - how do you deal with the chips in public places?

            Tom

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            • #7
              We live in a world that is compressed into phone....what is everyone doing? Playing on the phone and pushing buttons. When they see someone that is actually doing something physical and making something and using their brain and being creative...., ....they notice.

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              • #8
                Gleber, I use what I call a "Kangaroo Apron". The bottom folds up, attaches with velcro and has a plastic ring to keep it open. It can even hold the few tools I need for this particular carving session. They are available from several woodcarving supply places. I carve the chips into this pocket and empty them into a waste bin.

                I was a bit concerned when I first started carving at the Clinic. I was unsure how it would be received. Then on one of my visits a nurse came over to look. She said, "From across the lobby, I thought you actually had brought a live bird in here".

                I took the opportunity to bring up the subject of how the staff there felt about my carving. Her reply assured me that I was OK. She said, "We should pay you to sit out here and carve. Patients are intent on watching you and do not complain about how late the doctor is running!

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                • #9
                  You see what happens Paul when you break a habit, everyone notices. Now carving in public is a good habit, and we have found it a great way to pass the time while waiting, and you get to meet the nicest people. Keep up the good work my friend.

                  Bob
                  Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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                  • #10
                    Paul - My late wife spent many days in the hospital. To fill the waiting time I would do some carving - usually outdoors near the entry lobby. People would sometimes stop to look, or ask questions. My mind must not have been focused on the carving because I cannot remember what pieces I did at the time.

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                    • #11
                      waw! to be known like that is great! I have a question for everyone who carves in public: how do people react when they see you with a knife. Here in Belgium I do not consider doing some carving in public (like a park or in front of the house) because I think people would call emergency or police. In Sweden I walk in the woods and hike with a mora knife on my side. There no one seems to consider it bizarre or dangerous.
                      Jos
                      Belgium

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                      • #12
                        When I was in the hospital last year for several days after colon surgery waiting to get to functioning again I carved and gave away pencils, pencils don't make too many wood chips and I made sure to give the cleaning crew a pencil
                        Herb

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul_Guraedy View Post
                          Gleber, I use what I call a "Kangaroo Apron". The bottom folds up, attaches with velcro and has a plastic ring to keep it open. It can even hold the few tools I need for this particular carving session. They are available from several woodcarving supply places. I carve the chips into this pocket and empty them into a waste bin.

                          I was a bit concerned when I first started carving at the Clinic. I was unsure how it would be received. Then on one of my visits a nurse came over to look. She said, "From across the lobby, I thought you actually had brought a live bird in here".

                          I took the opportunity to bring up the subject of how the staff there felt about my carving. Her reply assured me that I was OK. She said, "We should pay you to sit out here and carve. Patients are intent on watching you and do not complain about how late the doctor is running!
                          Thanks for the info. That makes sense. It's nice to bring something out of the ordinary to other people, plus the fact that you are a hermit must intrigue them even more. :-)

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                          • #14
                            Paul are you a chainsaw carver?

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                            • #15
                              In today's climate they might be after sharp knives and sharp paper you might have. That is the great fear. They used to have men playing 42 (dominoes game) until the unruly kids stole them
                              and the old men would snatch a hand waiting for it to open. Mommy power remove the old men and soon someday will have a kid in jail.

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