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  • nuther flower Q

    Couple geniuses here came through for me last time, so I thought i'd try again. anybody know what this plant is?
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    Buffalo Bif
    www.bflobif.com

  • #2
    It would have to be a weed before I could come close.
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      I think it's a "yellar what'cha call it " .... you can now add my name to your list of geniuses .....
      If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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      • #4
        I believe it is called African Wild Cassia (lat: Cassia Didymobotyra). Hope this helps.
        ~ Dwight
        "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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        • #5
          Hey Bif
          If you google what Dwight said you will find it to be poisonous according to the article.
          Larry

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          • #6
            The good ole birds bring in seed and plant all sorts of stuff here. Crazy. Sometimes we get a flock of thousands and look out wonder where they were last! We have pairs of birds wintering on our farm-ette as I type. We have a good number of Live oak which are dense and White and Red oak. Pines and Hack berries as well. Then the extra plants...

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            • #7
              Anybody hear from Bill
              . . .JoeB

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              • #8
                woohoo! Knew you guys would come through- thanks Dwight, think you are right. Soggy gets an honorable mention.....
                Buffalo Bif
                www.bflobif.com

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                • #9
                  Dwight is right but the species is called Senna didymobotrya is a potential medicinal plant and the medicinal values are explored well in many parts of the world by traditional practitioners (Nagappan, 2012). In Kenya, traditionally the Kipsigis community has been using these plants to control malaria as well as diarrhea (Korir et al., 2012). The pastoralists of West Pokot peel the bark, dry the stem and burn it into charcoal that they use to preserve milk (Tabuti, 2007). In addition, it has been used to treat skin conditions of humans and livestock infections as well (Njoroge and Bussmann, 2007). It is also used in the treatment of animal diseases such as removal of ticks (Njoroge and Bussmann, 2006). In Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, root decoction of this plant has been used for the treatment of malaria, other fevers, ringworm, jaundice and intestinal worm (Nagappan, 2012). The root or leaf mixed with water or decoction of fresh parts has been used to treat abscess of the skeletal muscle and venereal diseases (Kamatenesi-Mugisha, 2004). The plant is also useful for the treatment of fungal, bacterial infections, hypertension, haemorrhoides, sickle cell anemia, a range of women’s diseases such as inflammation of fallopian tubes, fibroids and backache, to stimulate lactation and to induce uterine contraction and abortion (Tabuti, 2007). The antibacterial activities of hexane extract against Microsporum gypsum, has been reported (Korir et al., 2012). According to Reddy et al., (2010), presence of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and carotenoids in the ethyl acetate extract of leaves are responsible for pronounced antibacterial activities. A decoction or infusion from the leaves, stems and roots of S. didymobot
                  . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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                  • #10
                    Wow, Di- science overload! You forgot the part that is looks cool too. No idea who got the idea to plant it outside the local Dicks Sporting Goods here in Zone 6, but there it is. thanks for all the input.
                    Buffalo Bif
                    www.bflobif.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Buffalo Bif View Post
                      Wow, Di- science overload! You forgot the part that is looks cool too. No idea who got the idea to plant it outside the local Dicks Sporting Goods here in Zone 6, but there it is. thanks for all the input.
                      It is an invasive species here in the islands.... Plus consider poisonous....which ticks me off.....LOL.... big Pharm drugs puts out any herbal medicine that works and been used for thousands of years is poisonous....when in fact big Pharm drugs there is a fact sheet about five pages long at the Mayo clinic of just how poisonous each of their drugs are. So it continues....money against free medicine..... Di hates politics.
                      . Explore! Dream! Discover!” aloha Di

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