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Autumn in Whooping Hollow 2018

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  • lionslair
    replied
    So many smoke to much for meat. The 'rind' should be ringed and the inner part all pink. Getting 'smoke' all through can really make it bad tasting. Some of it is excessive 'smoke' injections fluid. Martin

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Paul, my folks had a meat packing plant and Dad would use nothing but apple wood

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    My "smoking" journey has exposed me to a variety of preferences. In Rapides Parish, Louisiana the preferred wood was pecan, in north Georgia it was hickory, in New Mexico and Arizona it was mesquite, in Alaska it was alder and in Arkansas I returned to hickory.

    After retirement, I got truly serious about smoking and now use both a gas (Propane) grill and electric slow smoker. For steaks, chops and ribs I prefer the grill and use hickory to provide the smoke. The meat is exposed to the smoke for a minimum time and it tolerates a stronger wood. Actually, I use hickory nuts (green in summer, dried in the winter) to provide my smoke.

    All other protein is cooked in my electric slow smoker. I have smoked oysters, shrimp, fish (local and salmon), chicken, turkey and even vegetables. This Thanksgiving I will be trying a new challenge Peking Duck. In the "smoker" I prefer to use fruit wood ~ mainly apple.

    The brisket shown was done by my son ~ Philip. He started with about a 30 pound brisket (the pieces shown were two of three). He removed the fat so that only a thin layer was left before coating it on both sides with yellow mustard, followed by his own rub. The temperature was already set at 220°F and smoker allowed to preheat.

    It was now 10pm and time to get started smoking. Uh Oh! The only wood left in his bin was apple ~ so that's what he used. The hopper was filled with chips, the heat probe in the thickest piece, the liquid reservoir filled with a mixture of apple juice and beer and the smoker was left alone (unopened) for four hours. At 2am, Philip spritzed the meat with apple juice, ensured the hopper had sufficient chips, and went back to bed ~ repeating this at 4am and again at 6am.

    When the heat probe registered 165°F (around noon) ~ he wrapped the meat in two layers of aluminum foil (one from the bottom and one from the top) before returning the meat to the smoker. When the heat probe registered 190°F ~ he removed the meat from the smoker and put it in an insulated cooler. He had place two heavy towels in the bottom of the cooler, used several to wrap each chunk of meat individually, put the meat in the cooler, filled the cooler with more insulating towels, placed the top on and left it for 3 hours.

    When he removed the meat from the cooler it was still hot enough to blister your skin and had to be handled with meat forks. Apparently this allows the meat to break down further and assure that all liquid is re-absorbed.

    That, my Frien's, is how Philip cooked the best brisket I have ever tasted. He had cooked one June 20, 2017 to celebrate 50 years of marriage for Diana and I. I vacuum sealed a chunk and put it in the deep freeze. It got pushed to the back ~ and forgotten. I found it last August! It was as good as it had been 14 months earlier.

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  • tbox61
    replied
    Paul...that looks waaaay too good!

    Growing up on our farm, my dad's preference was mulberry. That's what took care of all of our pork and deer link sausage. I can close my eyes, think back, and still smell the smoke come out of the metal granary we used for a smokehouse!

    Got to smell it again a second time when we brought the sausage rings in the house when my mom canned it!

    What memories!

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  • Brian T
    replied
    50 years ago, Dad was using mesquite for BBQ smoke and mesquite lump charcoal for grilling.
    Was always too bitter for me. I tried it again just a few years back = same thing.

    West coast alder is OK but fruit woods, apple in particular for an hour+, is a best seller in my house.

    I have a Breville smoke gun to use in the kitchen. I think the smell in the kitchen is the real benefit,
    too small and short smokes to do much to covered & roasted foods.

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
    Good for what ever ails you. I need slaw with that. Eat slow.
    Paul: did you learn what their favorite smoke wood is? Always curious ( I use apple).
    In Texas, I'd bet mesquite. I use mesquite or hickory, they both give a robust, hearty smoke flavor in just an hour or two.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Good for what ever ails you. I need slaw with that. Eat slow.
    Paul: did you learn what their favorite smoke wood is? Always curious ( I use apple).

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Good looking chow, yipe

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  • lionslair
    replied
    Finger licking good. The Texas stuff that is. We were in the hill country not long ago.

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    started a topic Autumn in Whooping Hollow 2018

    Autumn in Whooping Hollow 2018

    So, Diana and I came down to visit our Texas kids. Then I texted back to the Holler bragging about eating at the Bavarian Grill for their October Fest. Especially enjoying my new favorite beer Weltenburger Kloster Barock Dunkel Lager - Munich Dunkel. No answer.

    So, today I sent another text elaborating on our Sunday dinner of slow smoked pork belly IMG_0507.jpg for an appetizer followed by slow smoked (12 hours) brisket IMG_0514.jpg along with baked beans and potato salad.

    Sunnie texted back about Autumn arriving in Hoopin Holler. Revenge? IMG_0513.JPG Then piled on with IMG_0511.JPG and finally IMG_0510.JPG

    Now I'm not sure eating at restaurants with tablecloths and cloth napkins holds the same appeal. At least all color should not all be gone next Sunday when we return home!

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