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    My son and I are engaged in wood carving and we have our own instagram channel where we post our work. Sometimes we shoot reviews of tools. This is by no means an advertisement. I just wanted to ask does anyone know how to get an audience? It's not that important to me. I just want to help my son.

  • #2
    I would say try to post unique content. Content is really important for your page to get more traffic and reach more people. i would also say try to comment and be interactive under relevant pages as yours to make people realize you and check your page. Goodluck !

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    • #3
      My girlfriend also shoots interesting and high-quality videos on instagram. But unfortunately, she didn't have many calculations. I saw how hard she was trying, and I wanted to help her. I've been looking for a way out for a long time. And then one day I came across an interesting service that is gaining real subscribers. My friend was very happy because it really worked and her channel started to grow. If you are interested, https://www.simplygram.com/how-to-ge...-on-instagram/
      Last edited by Lucifer656; 06-10-2020, 02:17 AM.

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      • #4
        Hi
        this article can be helpfull. Look at the rest of the blog and site also. Very good and respected craftsman, certainly in the crafts and green wood world.
        http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/wood-cra...-craftspeople/
        Jos
        Belgium

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        • #5
          Just my opinion and we all know the story about opinions.

          I tend to evaluate the world to some extent by the observations in my own life.
          Our local carving club has about 30 members.
          We still have 6 or 20% who we snail mail information cause they don’t email or text.
          On the other end of the spectrum we have 6 / 20% who have a Facebook account.
          We have 10 / 33% members who frequently watch YouTube videos about carving.
          2 / 6.6% have an Instagram account. I have one and post an occasional photo but do nothing else. (because when are you going to carve) The other member has an account because his son who is overseas uses it to communicate with family.

          So what I’m seeing in my world is woodcarvers aren’t into Instagram. Leads me to believe that your son is using a media that doesn’t fit his target demographic.

          Ed
          https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
          Local club
          https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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          • #6
            I started making websites many years ago and SEO (search engine optimization) was a big deal. Once you understand the details of that you are ready for a website. Buy some good web design software (one is Coffeecup), use Google analytics, have meaningful content...and be unique. If you are selling wood carvings, narrow things down to a niche. For instance, maybe western, caricature, hand wood carving and narrow that down even farther. The more unique...the better.

            I've never used "Instagram" Facebook, or other "pop" sites. Go with the old workhorses...like Google. It works.
            Bill
            Living among knives and fire.

            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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            • #7
              Social media - affinity groups - may be geared to the masses. There are many human activities that do not depend on, or thrive well, in mass audiences. I am one of the "old fuddiduddies" that thinks you cannot become a woodcarver by watching someone carve. It is actually a very solitary activity.
              Last edited by pallin; 06-08-2020, 02:50 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pallin View Post
                Social media - affinity groups - may be geared to the masses. There are many human activities that do not depend on, or thrive well, in mass audiences. I am one of the "old fuddiduddies" that thinks you cannot become a woodcarver by watching someone carve. It is actually a very solitary activity.
                I agree and disagree which doesn’t seem right. You have to pickup the tool and learn how it works. But? Watching Ian Norbury carve I’ve seen and then adopted techniques that hadn’t occurred to me yet. At the same time I do believe some get so caught up in step by step videos or patterns they never experienced creativity.
                Ed
                https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
                Local club
                https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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                • #9
                  I'm searching for video of PacNW First Nations carvers at work.
                  For one reason: To watch their hand tool carving technique.

                  As Ed (Nebraska) relates, they handle the tools in such ways
                  which have never occurred to me over the past 5-7 years.

                  Not exactly a mainstream request on my part.
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pallin View Post
                    Social media - affinity groups - may be geared to the masses. There are many human activities that do not depend on, or thrive well, in mass audiences. I am one of the "old fuddiduddies" that thinks you cannot become a woodcarver by watching someone carve. It is actually a very solitary activity.
                    Phil, I wholeheartedly agree. Maybe it depends on what you carve, but I've never joined a carving club because I can't reconcile carving and socializing...I zone out when I carve, need to think ahead, and usually don't even hear the music I occasionally have on.

                    I learn more from studying the finished product from an accomplished carver than I do watching chips being made...that said, there are a couple of carvers that I would love to have a class with for very particular reasons.
                    Arthur

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                    • #11

                      Woodcarving is a very solitary avocation. It does require concentration and focused attention. That being given ~ I do enjoy socializing at woodcarving clubs and carving in public locations. The carvings I work on require little to no attention so interruptions are not a problem. I quickly found that my ability to assist novice carvers was greatly appreciated and spent most of my time helping them. In public, I enjoyed educating interested folks in enjoying and appreciating the art of woodcarving.

                      I believe that from novice to accomplished carvers ~ clubs are something that should be explored.

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                      • #12
                        I don't have much to offer with regard to "getting an audience". I created a website using Google a long time ago. Initially, I started with the intent of selling my Whittlebears. But there wasn't much interest in them--neither buyer nor the seller. I found I much rather give them away. I looked into the advertisement aspect, but again attracting people and making money just seemed to detract from my interest--woodcarving. It's mine and I don't want any interference in what I do or how I do it.

                        I do have thoughts on some of the other response to this thread:

                        I zone out when I carve, need to think ahead, and usually don't even hear the music I occasionally have on
                        And I thought I was alone. I too go to "that place" where it's not easy to get to me. I enjoy carving so much--especially when all is quiet and there are no interruptions.

                        The carvings I work on require little to no attention
                        I agree for the most part. When I carve my little bears I'm pretty much on autopilot. I carve the usual steps and before I know it I have a carved bear. But the interesting part I have discovered, it doesn't matter what I'm carving, it just that I'm carving and I'm enjoying it.

                        you cannot become a woodcarver by watching someone carve. It is actually a very solitary activity.
                        To some degree, I agree. Maybe initially, it helps to watch someone carve--I find watching someone carve on You Tube or a video is helpful when I am doing something for the first time. An example, I began watching a youtube video this morning where the carver was building a violin from scratch using nothing but hand tools. I am so intrigued--and I have questions. If I was in the presence of this man, I would have been asking these questions. And that would have been interrupting him in his carving. My point is watching someone carve can be informative as long as it is just that. Just as much as I desire to learn, it may be just as much a bother to the carver. And of course, once it becomes more social than informative, it isn't of much value to me. I learned and I would rather be carving. Sounds selfish, but as I said, woodcarving is mine. I want it to be what I want it to be.

                        Bob L

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                        • #13
                          I agree with Paul! I find that at a lot of club meetings, I spend more time helping others than I do working on my own projects. But you learn a lot from carving with others or watching people carve or sharpen. It is even better when it is in-person and you can ask questions or hear people's stories. I started making and using clay models to improve my carvings based on a conversation I heard between Rich Wetherbee and Chris Hammack. I learn about places to buy tools and supplies and learn about great carvers who were before my time. Sometimes you don't know the questions to ask or who to ask if you are by yourself. Not to say that you can't be a good carver, as everyone is different. But you are missing out on some knowledge that you could easily obtain. Also, if you have a desire to sell your carvings, you have to interact with people, to let them know about your work and about yourself. I have a website that I sell through, but I post my carvings on Facebook and often sell a carving before I can add it to my website. I don't really post on Pinterest, but I find a lot of pictures of my carvings out there that others have pinned. I think some carvers are doing what you are trying through youtube channels.
                          'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

                          http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
                          https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
                          http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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                          • #14
                            I tend to agree with Woodburner on this; finding a niche you enjoy, promoting that via a website (+ personal connections, email, business cards, friends, family, maybe a show/fair every so often) is a very good way to go. I'm in the process on changing the homepage of my site to more on an online store - and it will almost be exclusively the dolphins (and maybe some Santas come the fall). These are the two things I've been able to sell with some small success, and I like making them.

                            Now . . . "success" in my mind is that every so often somebody buys something. It's just adds a little something extra - and a few bucks - to the hobby I would be doing anyway.

                            I've never been comfortable with social media (Facebook, Instagram, etc) since to use it effectively you really need to devote daily attention to self-promotion and salesmanship. Those are two things that - for me - would suck the fun out of the whole process. It's why I got off of Etsy . . . it seems a lot of social-media promotion was necessary to try and compete with zillions of other folks
                            Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

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                            • #15
                              This is going to sound politically incorrect and chauvinistic as all hell but add some female company to your videos and your viewer count will increase greatly. If you're not providing some sort useful service like carving tutorials then you need to find a carrot to draw in your viewers. There's a guy in Kentucky that goes out every weekend to trot line fish for catfish on the green river. If his son is not with him then he takes a lady friend along. In a year he went from posting his first video to 127K subscribers. Another example is a long haul trucker who has his wife along with him providing input to his videos. In a year he's gone from nothing to 1.3K subcribers. You have a lot of competition so you have to make your videos interesting and relative. Even Doug Liker includes his wife and family on occasion. Doug's a great carver but wouldn't it get s little boring if he didn't mix up his videos? Just my opinion.

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