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  • Humbling

    When I feel the need to be humbled.

    Maria Duglioli Barberini, 1626 Giuliano Finelli.
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    This gallery has 1 photos.
    Ed
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
    Local club
    https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

  • #2
    Me oh my! And without power tools! It is nice to see what humbles the people who humble me!

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    • #3
      That's what separates us chip makers from the real artisans in this world.

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      • #4
        I’m like Sappy, good to see what humbles the one who humbles me! I admire your work Ed, keep posting!

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        • #5
          1626 - That would be about twenty years before the birth of Grinling Gibbons. The lace collar reminds me of Gibbon's famous lace cravat. But Finelli was working in marble rather than wood.
          Last edited by pallin; 07-14-2021, 11:51 AM.

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          • #6
            Amazing work.That kind of talent is always humbling. The hours of work in that detail must have been in the many of hundreds.
            We live in the land of the free because of the brave!
            https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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            • #7
              Here is a link to Grinling Gibbon's famous Cosimo Panel:

              cosimo-panel-by-grinling-gibbons-palazzo-pitti-florence_1_orig.jpg (567×802) (picturesfromitaly.com)

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              • #8
                Heck, I don't need to go that far back to be humbled...I can get that right here!
                Arthur

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                • #9
                  Intricate and great work. Sure appreciate those masters.
                  Bill
                  Living among knives and fire.

                  http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, go ahead and look......... I'll be right back,..... I've got a few carvings that I gotta go throw in the wood stove
                    If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pallin View Post
                      1626 - That would be about twenty years before the birth of Grinling Gibbons. The lace collar reminds me of Gibbon's famous lace cravat. But Finelli was working in marble rather than wood.
                      Yes it is a carving in marble, the first time I saw it I was simply awe struck by the fine detail. It is said that the original owner displayed it in his home in a wire cage to prevent guests from touching the work. I find myself wonder what the work done by the “Master” sculptor looked like?

                      Ed
                      https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
                      Local club
                      https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ed, I feel the same way when I see the works of Michael Angelo and Bernini from St. Peters Cathedral in the Vatican. When you add to the beauty and quality of their works the volume of produced by these great artists, it is even more incredible. All done with no power tools and no electric lights. They were truly inspired.

                        Tim

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                        • #13
                          I'll make a bet∙∙∙∙I'll bet he used more than a ball-ping hammer and center punch .
                          Just wonder how much time they spent????
                          . . .JoeB

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                          • #14
                            oh, and no capital letters here , after spending some time in europe i cannot even think of doing . and stone workings..
                            yes.
                            chuck
                            Chuck
                            Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                            https://woodensmallthings.blogspot.com/2021/01/

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                            • #15
                              Just some information especially in old sculpture.....they had help. Artists' assistants work with, and often under direct instruction from, artists in the production or preparation of artworks. Many famous and influential artists have worked with assistants and this goes from old history to even today. In fact it was part of learning to work under a master instructor for a very long time.

                              While the names of many artists' assistants are never known. However, some artist assistants have become famous in their own right either as artists[ or for their role as assistants. One of the most famous is Salai who was an assistant and pupil of Leonardo da Vinci. Just think how good your work would look if you had a handful of very skilled students doing your work for you....smile.

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