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WiTcHeS

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  • #16
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Splendid carving Mark! Love it. She has character! Not beauty, but plenty of character!!! LOL

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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    • #17
      Re: WiTcHeS

      Here is a link I found. OH BOY! Anthony Costanza. WOW. I see he was also the carver that had the witch featured in last falls magazine. How I missed that one, I'll never know! Again, WOW!

      http://www.christmas-treasures.com/W...nyCostanza.htm

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      • #18
        Re: WiTcHeS

        OK-I have started my relief carving. I really like this! Thanks for your inspiration-this is such a great community! I can't wait to show you as I go Have a gorgeous day!

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        • #19
          Re: WiTcHeS

          This is a Mike Shipley rough out:
          http://www.oldwoodshack.com/catalog/...h%209%2013.jpg

          Corey

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          • #20
            Awful Olga the Witch

            Keoma, I have a witch for you. What I have is a little different. I'll explain.

            I use to do a lot of puppet shows years ago. I developed this character of a witch called Awful Olga. She has a great routine that includes picking her nose and flicking the boogers at the kids and finding a flea on in her hair and then eating it. She is really disgusting and the kids just love her. In the end she casts a spell that backfires and makes herself disappear in a puff of smoke.



            I carved her head from foam rubber with very sharp knives. she is covered with a special liquid vynil process that is thin and flexible. Only now after almost 20 years has she has started to show cracks in the paint. Her hat is made with paper mache'. Black fur cloth for hair.

            Dig that crazy profile.



            Being so flexible, she has a lot of life in her. Her hat is attached in such a way that it bounces around when she gets outraged (it happens).



            She also has an ugly rubber hand for the nose picking and gesticulating.

            One more pic to show you how big she is.



            Who is that guy?

            Now you have inspired me to make a kitchen witch, too.

            Say, wont you please post a pic of your kitchen witch? Your avatar is just too small to see the details and I would just love to see her.

            Christopher

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            • #21
              Re: WiTcHeS

              HEY!!! I know that girl--I went out with her last Thursday!! OOOPPPSSS!!!

              Keoma,

              If you call customer service, they will send you a colored copy of the article that you're looking for. I believe they charge $5--but you might be able to get a back issue for a little more.

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              • #22
                Re: WiTcHeS

                Witch? Witch? WITCH? How many photos can I post before I bore people off line?

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                • #23
                  Re: WiTcHeS

                  OH NANCY! Those gals are phenominal! I just love them! What charachter! Thank you for posting! I so badly want to carve witches and have them all about my house!

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                  • #24
                    Re: WiTcHeS

                    Here's a pattern I made up about 5 or 6 years ago. Feel free to use it if you want. Nancy suggested having the hair flowing back a bit more, which would make sense. I'll see if I can find a picure of the finished project. It's put away now untill halloween...comes out to haunt every fall then gets relegated to the attic.

                    The broom and boots were carved seperately and attached later.

                    Al

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                    • #25
                      Re: WiTcHeS

                      Can't seem to load the picture of Hazel in the last frame so here goes another try.

                      Al

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                      • #26
                        Re: WiTcHeS

                        Will send picture of my wife....you're welcome to us it.

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                        • #27
                          Re: WiTcHeS

                          Thank you for the pattern! That is perfect! What a rump your carving has! Wowee! This would be a great pattern to hang on a string as a kitchen witch! Thank you!

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                          • #28
                            Re: WiTcHeS

                            Christopher! How in Gawds name did I miss that?! Flicking Boogers! OMG! I would love to have seen her act! Aweful Olga is a dear! She is so amazing! BOth my boys are extatic and think we should have one...I think they are right! The tongue just kills me! She trully looks like something from MacBeth! Great Job! Do you bring her out every Halloween? This is not something I would keep put away...My husband would...but I wouldn't...but he's ascared of them...and I'm not!
                            Thank you for trying to look at my Kitchen witch! I will most assuredly post her! Proud To!

                            This is my first Witch-Alma Mae Strega...she is my favorite




                            My 3rd...Judy B.


                            My Inspiration for all things witchy...My favorite childhood book o'course!I am also studying to become an herbalist, so I love the folklore that goes along with that!

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                            • #29
                              Re: WiTcHeS

                              I need help with eyes. I usually forgo the whole idea and pen them on when I am through. Anyone know how I can start?

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                              • #30
                                Re: WiTcHeS

                                Keoma, I like your witches a lot! How close to puppets they are. Alma Mae looks like a rod puppet. Are you familiar with rod puppets? Take your sons here and enjoy a look around:

                                The Puppetry Home Page

                                I can tell you about carving eyes. As you carve your head, you will start to hollow out the eye sockets. By this I don't mean the actual eye sockets, I am referring the indented shape below the eye brow and above the cheek on either side of the nose. This shape is important as it helps define the structure of the face and deturmined weather the eyes are sunken or bulging. You want to make the shape look as natural as possible. At this point keep in mind that you are carving a face with the eye closed, so you don't want to go deep into the creases of the eye at this point. In fact to be shy of the depth you want at this point is a good thing because you can always carve it deeper once you have defined the shape.

                                Here is a photo of my gnome when I was beginning to define the face just as I have described.



                                If you study this photo you will see that I didn't take the eye socket back far enough on the outside edge, towards the ear. To be completely correct it should have gone back a bit on each outside edge because his eyes are lining up too flat across the face and real eyes are beveled slightly to each other. The reason why I left it like this was because I was having a difficult time carving this particular bit of wood. It comes from a fence post that was so old that the bottom was rotted off, must be some 60 years old and extremely dry. As a result of the extreme dryness my tools would mush the wood instead of cut it cleanly if they were not surgically sharp. You can see the pitting around the nose and cheeks from the the wood tearing. I got it this far and decided it was close enough and I didn't want to fret over it.

                                Once you have the shape defined, then you draw on the key lines that will map out eyes and facial lines, smile lines, eye brows, crow's feet, etc. The lines you want to draw are valley lines and crown lines.

                                A valley line defines the deepest area of a particular feature.

                                A crown line defines the area you most likely will leave as is until final shape detailing and finishing. The protruding parts of the facial features such as the the ridge of the brow and the crest of the cheek.

                                Here is a drawing I made for you to show you a typical application of crown and valley lines. In my drawing the lines are all drawn with pencil, but you could color code the lines, but in my experience this is a waist of time because all you want to do really is give yourself a reminder of the limits and parameters so you can work the different parts without blundering into the wrong area. Color coding probably would be a good idea for a novice.



                                There are some lines that have a crown on one side of the line and a valley on the other side. the lines that define the shape of the eye is just such a line. On one side is the eye lid that you want to leave protruding for now and on the other side is the eyeball that will probably be the deepest cuts you will make on the face. The side of the nose is another place this happens.

                                Here is the same drawing with shading added to help you see how the shapes are intended to be executed.



                                The perimeter of the eyes is a natural place to start drawing facial lines as the eyes will determine so much about the look of your new friend. The valley lines help you make the shape even on both sides as you first carve one side and then the other and carve both sides as you go. This is the best way to keep a symmetrical features.

                                Start to carve by going deep down the valley lines. This can be done with a knife, but the best way us with a "V" gouge as it cuts both sides and the bottom at the came time and all you need to do is help the tool realize the shape of the depth you want. A little tricky-er with a knife as you put a straight cut down the center of the valley line and then carve an angle line down both sides to form a V shape.

                                A "V" gouge is best for the outline of the eyes and any creases in the face and a regular "U" gouge is good for the valley line between the top of the eye lid and the eye brow.

                                Work slowly with controlled cuts, copying the cuts on each side of the face. Carve the eye round and round-off and smooth the other features. Once you have every section in it's initial carved shape you will be able to step back and see how it is coming along and then make the decision to change the shapes. Make them deeper to change the look to what your looking for or make the crowns softer and less pronounced. i.e. less cheek makes the smile less.

                                Here is the gnome once the face was detailed.



                                You will notice I carved the pupils of the eyes out. I was experimenting with how it wold look. I don't like the results once it's painted. I learned that carved out pupils are best on carvings left natural wood. If it is to be painted then the ball shaped eye works much better.

                                I have more thought on this, but this is enough for now.

                                Christopher

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