Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WiTcHeS

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Thank you for the horrid positivity Deborah! As for me, I happen to like the pretty witches a lot! I have creepy ones out at halloween, but my not so creepy ones stay out all year. I have started my sketch for my pattern. Very exciting. Have you all ever seen a Witch in a Flannel shirt? Well, you will. I am going with something here...I told you I like the prety ones he he

    Leave a comment:


  • Callynne
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    No Goody, I don't mind you posting my picture (okay, that would be a picture of my witch! Sarcastic ), thank you for the kind words!

    When I posted that picture someone commented I'd made her too pretty looking, the others posted here are fantastic examples of witch faces and I see what they mean. Their expressions, the look of their mouthes, perfect!! Thanks for posting them guys! Keoma, can't wait to see what you come up with. She'll be horrid in the best of ways, I'm sure!! Deborah
    </IMG></IMG>

    Leave a comment:


  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    O my gosh...i hope i can create one 1/2 as lovely!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim OH
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Here are a couple pictures I took at a CCA display last year. This one was done by Michele Carville, Dave Stenson's wife. She may have a roughout if you are interested. She did an excellent job on this witch and really does a fantastic job on Santas! Hope ya enjoy it!
    Jim OH

    Leave a comment:


  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    OMG wow! that is quite a witch! She looks horrid and wonderful at the same time! (please know when I say Horrid it is a good horrid!) I am thinking of starting with some polymer clay to practice. So thank you for posting! Amazing!

    Leave a comment:


  • Sharon of the Dell
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    HI keoma, thought I would show you a doll my sis and I made about 9 or 10 years ago. She's not a kitchen witch but I made her in mine, and my sister made the little witch and her rotten little kids in her kitchen.They're polymer clay.It's called bad hair day. They all stay in a box where they belong until halloween.LOL Hope you enjoy.......

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Cahill
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    I don't know if chip chats have a link of there old patterns or not perhaps if you can find a carving club you could get a copy from them it is Sept/Oct 2001 Page 26

    Leave a comment:


  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    DON! She is so great! Communing with her cat! I love the colors you chose! She looks like she could use some sun and has moss for hair-Perfect! Where can I find this kind of wood? Bark?

    ROBERT-would you happen to have a link for that image? Thanx! I am anxious to see it!

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Cahill
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Keoma,
    was browsing through some old Chip chat magazine and sept/oct 2001 issue has a wall hanging witch by Leah Wachter it is done from a 2" thick 12 1/2 inches hight and 10 1/2 inches wide piece of basswood.

    Leave a comment:


  • Don by the lake
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Here is one I did from cottonwood bark.

    Leave a comment:


  • GardenGnome
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Originally posted by Keoma
    Wow? So much information and I could actually understand it!
    Thanks, keoma. Your comment has made my efforts here worthwhile. What good is knowledge unless it is shared with people who can appreciate it?

    One day, back in 1979, I was in San Louis Obispo for the Puppeteers Of America convention. At the time I was designing and building mascots. I had been experimenting with different techniques for applying different surfaces to foam rubber. Foam by itself is a good building material for making puppets, but it is light and air sensitive and needs to be covered or else it breaks down over time. The one surface that was eluding me was a shiny smooth flexible one. I was able to sort of do this, but all my efforts resulted in thick inflexible failures.
    While I was at the convention I took a workshop with a Mr. Hoe who made puppets for stop frame animation. He was an expert in the dinosaur genre and his puppets were wonderful and they were made from foam rubber and covered with a smooth flexible rubber coating. He never spoke of the surface through his talk, so when it came time for questions, I asked him how it was done. He kept giving me general answers describing what was done, but he kept eluding my question and never gave the secret until I kept asking. I could see in his eyes he was reluctant to say, but he asked me my name, and then he told me.

    That one small bit of information was revolutionary to me and has affected everything I have done since then. So Mr. Hoe was kind enough to share knowledge with me that had a profound effect on my life and art work. Over the years I have come to really understand how a simple idea, when shared, can profoundly improve things. I hope by sharing my knowledge, experience and ideas that someone, somewhere, will see a light go on.

    Of course there are those who resist new ideas and change. Poor souls who blindly writhe and wince about in a cage of their own making. I can only offer them a key and if they fail to pick it up or even realize there is a key there at all, more is the pity.

    Please do not alter Alma Mae. She is a treasure in her own right. A perfect expression of where you were and where you wanted to go with your carving. Some of my most cherished carvings (aside from my puppets) I have now are works I did many many years ago and to look at them reminds me of so much. They truly have become life long friends. Every now and again they catch my eye and we rejoice in silence as to how far we have come together and they keep popping up in old photos, too.

    This is one of my long time friends who originally was a test for a flexible surface on foam some 30 years ago. I was compelled to carve something for tests because the processes were so expensive that I had to make something.



    The test failed, but Fred the fish has been hanging on my walls ever since. Now he keeps me company when I am doing laundry He is about 14 inches from top to bottom and is a larger than life model of a real angel fish I had at the time. He is showing signs of wear now and our cat chewed off his fin tippys. I do so enjoy him because I love angel fish and I carved him long ago. He's my old friend.

    My goodness! No wonder you are sore from carving maple. The only things I carve from hardwood are tool handles when I make tools. That head is carved from Alaskan yellow cedar and as I recall it cost me a fortune. Wonderful to carve and light, too, that is a serious consideration when making 31" tall marionettes.

    You should pick up every free scrap of wood you find in your travels. If you see someone cutting firewood ask them if you might have a piece or two and pick some nice chunks, as clear as possible. Cedar is awful nice to carve, but it can be a pain as well as it is prone to splitting if you attack it from the wrong angle. I mostly like to carve pine or fur. I go to the lumber yard and look through the stack of 2" x 4"s to find one that is as clear as possible, but the best ones have a tight grain. Any boards with tight grain are hard to come by now, as they are taking trees before they mature these days. If you see an old house being demolished, sprint over there and see what you can get. Sometimes a veritable smorgasbord of dimensional lumber and the older buildings most likely have that close tight grain that you are looking for. Basswood is terrific and a dream to carve, but once again it can cost an arm and a leg for a half decent block. Personally I shy away from expensive lumber to carve as I find it intimidating. On the other hand, when I find a chunk of wood in the firewood box and carve something out of it I am always happy in the doing and the results. I found an old cedar fence post in the firebox from which I carved the gnome. Free wood equals nothing but pleasure. Even if your carving attempt fails you can still have a good experience.

    I await your next project photos with anticipation.

    Good carving.

    Christopher

    Leave a comment:


  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Wow? Christopher that was amazing! So much information and I could actually understand it! Not only that-but I feel like I can do it! I love this second carving! This is such an inquisitive look! I am almost tempted to go back and carve eyes on Alma Mae...but maybe I will leave her for what she is. She does look old fashioned with them drawn on.
    What kind of wood have you used in this face? I have been useing unforgiving maple.It is work with untold rewards...but my hand hurts Thank you for all your help. When I get up the nerve I will post what I have been toiling with

    Leave a comment:


  • GardenGnome
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    On this face you can see how the crown and valley lines were used to create a much more subtle effect.



    Once the shape was painted it looked like this.



    So you see, until the eyes are carved it is never too late. If you can draw an eye on, it can be carved in as well.

    Christopher

    Leave a comment:


  • GardenGnome
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    Keoma, I like your witches a lot! How close to puppets they are. Alma Mae looks like a rod puppet. Are you familiar with rod puppets? Take your sons here and enjoy a look around:

    The Puppetry Home Page

    I can tell you about carving eyes. As you carve your head, you will start to hollow out the eye sockets. By this I don't mean the actual eye sockets, I am referring the indented shape below the eye brow and above the cheek on either side of the nose. This shape is important as it helps define the structure of the face and deturmined weather the eyes are sunken or bulging. You want to make the shape look as natural as possible. At this point keep in mind that you are carving a face with the eye closed, so you don't want to go deep into the creases of the eye at this point. In fact to be shy of the depth you want at this point is a good thing because you can always carve it deeper once you have defined the shape.

    Here is a photo of my gnome when I was beginning to define the face just as I have described.



    If you study this photo you will see that I didn't take the eye socket back far enough on the outside edge, towards the ear. To be completely correct it should have gone back a bit on each outside edge because his eyes are lining up too flat across the face and real eyes are beveled slightly to each other. The reason why I left it like this was because I was having a difficult time carving this particular bit of wood. It comes from a fence post that was so old that the bottom was rotted off, must be some 60 years old and extremely dry. As a result of the extreme dryness my tools would mush the wood instead of cut it cleanly if they were not surgically sharp. You can see the pitting around the nose and cheeks from the the wood tearing. I got it this far and decided it was close enough and I didn't want to fret over it.

    Once you have the shape defined, then you draw on the key lines that will map out eyes and facial lines, smile lines, eye brows, crow's feet, etc. The lines you want to draw are valley lines and crown lines.

    A valley line defines the deepest area of a particular feature.

    A crown line defines the area you most likely will leave as is until final shape detailing and finishing. The protruding parts of the facial features such as the the ridge of the brow and the crest of the cheek.

    Here is a drawing I made for you to show you a typical application of crown and valley lines. In my drawing the lines are all drawn with pencil, but you could color code the lines, but in my experience this is a waist of time because all you want to do really is give yourself a reminder of the limits and parameters so you can work the different parts without blundering into the wrong area. Color coding probably would be a good idea for a novice.



    There are some lines that have a crown on one side of the line and a valley on the other side. the lines that define the shape of the eye is just such a line. On one side is the eye lid that you want to leave protruding for now and on the other side is the eyeball that will probably be the deepest cuts you will make on the face. The side of the nose is another place this happens.

    Here is the same drawing with shading added to help you see how the shapes are intended to be executed.



    The perimeter of the eyes is a natural place to start drawing facial lines as the eyes will determine so much about the look of your new friend. The valley lines help you make the shape even on both sides as you first carve one side and then the other and carve both sides as you go. This is the best way to keep a symmetrical features.

    Start to carve by going deep down the valley lines. This can be done with a knife, but the best way us with a "V" gouge as it cuts both sides and the bottom at the came time and all you need to do is help the tool realize the shape of the depth you want. A little tricky-er with a knife as you put a straight cut down the center of the valley line and then carve an angle line down both sides to form a V shape.

    A "V" gouge is best for the outline of the eyes and any creases in the face and a regular "U" gouge is good for the valley line between the top of the eye lid and the eye brow.

    Work slowly with controlled cuts, copying the cuts on each side of the face. Carve the eye round and round-off and smooth the other features. Once you have every section in it's initial carved shape you will be able to step back and see how it is coming along and then make the decision to change the shapes. Make them deeper to change the look to what your looking for or make the crowns softer and less pronounced. i.e. less cheek makes the smile less.

    Here is the gnome once the face was detailed.



    You will notice I carved the pupils of the eyes out. I was experimenting with how it wold look. I don't like the results once it's painted. I learned that carved out pupils are best on carvings left natural wood. If it is to be painted then the ball shaped eye works much better.

    I have more thought on this, but this is enough for now.

    Christopher

    Leave a comment:


  • Keoma
    replied
    Re: WiTcHeS

    I need help with eyes. I usually forgo the whole idea and pen them on when I am through. Anyone know how I can start?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X