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Clinched Nails?

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  • wade clark
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Susan,
    It looks great! Oiling the leathers will do wonders too... It'll make it just right! He's going to cherish it for a lifetime and pass it on to someone he loves, along with the story of you!
    Wade

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  • Irish
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Much to the joy of my dentist I clinch teeth very well!

    Thank you everyone for the ideas, especially Brian for the image!

    Later I will give the trunk another coat of linseed oil and oil the leathers. Then tomorrow I can wallpaper the inside ... I have this great primitive style sea harbor scene that is 20" high for inside the lid. But for now I am headed for the shower ... I smell a touch tired.

    Susan

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  • Hi_Ho_Sliver
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    right along with teeth clinching and fist clinching! LOL

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  • Irish
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Oh, Hi_Ho, I'm below the Mason - Dixon so it may be Yankee Ingenuity but it's a little Southern gal puttin' it back together again. I love learning somethin' new ... do you think I can add Nail Clinching to my resume?

    Susan

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  • Irish
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Brian, Thanks, that's a great image of the clinching!

    HI_Ho, I think (watch out as Susan is trying to use her brain) that the clinching does more then protect the articles inside of the trunk. They secure the nail! When I was taking them out they were tighter than a bolt with a rusted shut nut. Most of them I had to cut the top off the nail, get another strong nail as a ram rod and hammer them through to the inside to force the clinched end out of the wood. As a way to insure the nail NEVER walks out or loose ... clinching is the way to go.

    This poor old trunk was stored in someone's attic for years with quilting material in it. I know that the attic was painted in the 30's because the trunk had spots of Bubble Gum Green, a particular color noted from that time period. It has eaten at least a half gallon of linseed oil already, it is so dry, and I am going to give itat least one more coat before I'm done.

    If I say so myself ... which I'm gonna ... It's coming out pretty good for my first go at a steamer trunk.

    Susan

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  • wade clark
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    We here in Florida prefer to call it American Ingenuity, Y'all!

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  • Hi_Ho_Sliver
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    glad you figured it out, I have clinched nails just using a small sledge hammer on the backside..the secret is the brass nails as they are soft...those old trunks took a beating and a nail just driven in, would work its way out...nowadays they wouldn't care, but back then people took pride in what they made and wanted it to hold up.....I am sure there is also something to not protruding on the inside but they always had something, material or whatever there, so I believe the reason was for strength...now we have air nailers, brads and staples and when driven, the glue helps hold......they didn't have that....they had something much much better, yankee ingenuity!!

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  • kaiserb
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Survey says:

    http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/sto...s/wf/whistler/


    Picture:

    http://www.duckworksmagazine.com/sto...r/details2.gif

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Davidson
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    When they made these type of trunks the nails were curled back into the wood by using special backing bars. These bars were made usually by the trunk maker themselves thus creating their own signiture so to speak. The practicle side of it was to protect the contents from snagging. In some antique trunks I have seen the nails curled to the side like a worm and some that were even mushroomed and almost looked like a rivet. Van Dykes is the best that I found for restoring hardware. I have even in the past called them on special items not in the catalog and they can usually come up with a source. I used to love to restore antiques hence that is where most of my furniture came from. Ron

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  • Irish
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Talking Wade Talking

    That's where I went first!!! I got my new leather straps, leather handles, handle caps, new half ball feet, and the right brass and steel nails. AND it didn't cost me a mint ... only half a mint plus shipping! Van Dykes is a long time favorite.

    I did have to go to Shenandoah Antique Restorations at www.shenandoahrestorations.com for the leather end caps and brass rivets. Another half a mint but as this is a birthday present for my son who just turned 21 and appreciates antique tool chests and trunks it is well worth it. Now these nice people even have a forum where you can ask questions about refinishing trunks.

    Well ... any way ... I figured it out!!! Clinching nails are very easy, very quick, and a super strong hold. I simply drove the nail half way through the excess length. Turned the tip into the start of a circle with my needle nose plyers, braced that turn with the crow bar and drove home the nail. It curled deeply into the wood wonderfully. Since posting earlier I already have the half ball feet on, the leather handles riveted and their brass caps done. After I finish here I am off to add the leather straps.

    My hat is off to our forefathers. This trunk is inqenious in its construction, durablility and in the tricks they used to make it easy to create.

    Thanks everyone, Thanks Wade!

    Susan

    Leave a comment:


  • Just Carving
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    10 bucks says somebody has come up with a nail gun that shoots the nails in and curls them over just like an ordinary office stapler. If not, it sounds like a good idea!!

    Bob

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  • wade clark
    replied
    Re: Clinched Nails?

    Susan,
    STOP! Don't finish this project before you get a copy of Van Dykes Restorers Catalog! They have every possible piece of these old trunks in stock...sheet metals, corner caps, leather straps,leather, buckles, locks...you name it! And they're reasonable! They also have a taxidermy supply catalog with animal eyes, leather and all that requires. Call them at 1-800-843-3320 and get their restorers catalog. It's free, and it's 2 full days great entertainment reading it!

    The nails...I imagine they inserted them through a pre-drilled hole, placed a heavy hammer on the head of the nail to absorb impact, then tapped softly on the point until it curled.

    Have fun!
    Wade

    Leave a comment:


  • Irish
    started a topic Clinched Nails?

    Clinched Nails?

    I believe that there are a few wood workers and cabinet makers that browse the forum and perhaps one of you might have some info that they could share.

    I am refinishing an antique wood steamer trunk, circa 1870-1900. After removing the canvas covering and walking out the old nails and hardware I have done my sanding and oiling. Now I am ready to put on the new hardware and leathers.

    Now in working on this trunk I came face to face with a nail setting technique I had never heard of before (which is not surprising as there is a lot out there for me still to learn) ... clinched nails! The pine sides of the trunk are about 1/2" thick plus I need to add the leather's thickness of 1/4". A total of 3/4". The recommendations call for 1 1/4" to 1 1/2" brass or steel nails that are driven through the leather and wood then CURLED back on themselves on the inside of the wood.

    The nails were not bent over in at an L angle. They roll in a wonderful little circle right back into the wood. It looks as though something like a wide heavy crow bar may have been braced inside the trunk ... then the nail point driven to meet the crow bar ... then the crow bar used to guide the rolling or clinching.

    Any ideas would be extremely welcome. I am going to practice first. But having a limited supply of the brass and steel replacement nails I hate to end up losing all that I have then have to wait for a new supply to arrive.

    Thank You!

    Susan
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