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  • #16
    Re: National Carvers Museum

    Lynn is correct on the Colorado location of this museum. My wife and I visited it while on vacation in 1977-78. It was just north of the Air Force Academy off I-25 Stopping there on a whim is what got me first interested in carving. I bought a couple of blanks & a set of X-acto knives, a carving book by Harold Enlow and haven't stopped carving since.
    Also as noted, I agree that wood carving has really come a long way since then just as Native American Kachina carving has from the (traditional) stoic looking idols done for the tourist trade, to what's refered to as the the "action" figures that are done today.
    Mostly, I believe the advances in carving style(s), is in the details that carvers in all genres now apply no matter what their subject: be it caricature, relief, or chip carving, or heck, just plain whittlin'. And that's because we as carvers have grown in our individual ability, skill and artistry thru the encouragement and fellowship of the great carvers we see and meet on this web-site or at carving clubs & shows. I welcome it all, but sure do wish there was a National Carving Museum available once again.

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    • #17
      Re: National Carvers Museum

      Like I said at the beginning I got a good deal on a lot of issues of "The Mallet".

      Looking through some of the mags, I saw that a lot of people were miffed about the museum. Dealt mainly around the "life memberships". It is a shame that it closed. I remember an instructor that came to our carving club back in the 90's as I recall and he was all out in trying to save it. Hopefully when I get to read some more of the mags more information will come to light.

      One thing I noticed as I looked through the mags is what an influence Andy Anderson had on caricature carving. There were a lot of carvings pictured that showed his style.

      Thanks to everyone who answered my questions.

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      • #18
        Re: National Carvers Museum

        Thanks Gene...I was thinking of Chip Chats which I still receive from NWCA, not the Mallet.
        Keep On Carvin'
        Bob K.

        My Woodcarving blog: https://www.woodchipchatter.com


        My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


        My RWK Woodcarving Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwkwood


        My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

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        • #19
          Re: National Carvers Museum

          Was located at Monument, Colorado. North of Colorado Springs, right beside the interstate highway to Denver. Wife and I stopped there a number of years ago and spent several hours just looking around and enjoying the many carvings. Was sorry to hear it had failed.

          Gene

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          • #20
            Re: National Carvers Museum

            I startedcarving in 1984 and was fortunate enough to go the the museum carving rendevous twice. There were around three hundred carvers there from all over the United States! RV's were pretty new and were parked everywhere. I met and carved with Spike Boyd, Jack Price, Bobbie Thurman, Joe Wannamker, Claude Bolton, May Johnson, Dave Stetson, Steve Prescott, Jack Portice and many others. Classes were short and cheap. People were there to promote woodcarving and get to know others. Things were for sale, carvings, wood, tools, but most of all the talent was in abundance!! I made many friends that I have kept throughout the years and have seen at many different states while carving. Carvers are true friends, never hesitating to open their homes and hearts to fellow carvers.
            I have carved 1896 "little people" thanks to a four hour class from Jack Price. Taught many others and continue to carve every day. I think the experience I got from those many years ago started my passion for the art that I so enjoy.
            It was a sad day the museum closed, many hurt feelings, many carvings lost, but most of all a wonderful experience that brought so many of us together that others cannot have.
            Sharon Elliott "Whittlewomen"

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            • #21
              Re: National Carvers Museum

              I was told the museum closed in the late 80's. Carvings were returned to the carvers. For those that could not be returned, they were auctioned off. I knew several carvers from Oregon that donated carvings to the museum.

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