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  • Red Cedar oil

    First post.
    I am working on a project that the owner requested me to renew the Red Cedar aroma.
    Is there any such thing as a Red Cedar oil that can bring back the original aroma?
    Thanks
    Ed

  • #2
    Re: Red Cedar oil

    The aroma in most red cedar items is normally renewed by a light sanding of the surface. That's the recommended method by manufactures of cedar chests and closets. I'd give that a try before messing with additive oils or other chemical treatments.

    Al

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    • #3
      Re: Red Cedar oil

      I'm with Al on this one. I have never seen any kind of aromatic cedar oil.
      A light sanding with 320 grit or higher will bring back that wonderful aromatic smell. Any type of finish on it will very likely destroy the aromatic smell. that is why cedar chests that are lined with Juniperus viginiana are left unfinished.
      Other names: Red Cedar, Tennessee Cedar, Juniper. Hope this helps. Dan

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      • #4
        Re: Red Cedar oil

        Woodcraft has this:Buy Oil of Cedar Wood 8 Oz at Woodcraft I have never tried it so would be careful with using on the wife's furniture.
        Might be worth some experimentation :<).
        Have A Great Day
        Terry
        Of all the things I have lost I miss my mind the most!

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        • #5
          Re: Red Cedar oil

          I have made several red cedar bandsaw jewelry boxes for my Grandchildren last year. Left the inside unfinished and told them to lightly sand the inside to bring bake the aroma.

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          • #6
            Re: Red Cedar oil

            The use of common names like "Red Cedar" makes this whole thing really fuzzy to me. The most aromatic of the conifers might be species in the Juniperus genus, as riverwood-dan points out. Australians work in "red cedar", it's a monster of a hardwood species.

            The first thing I'd do is research the composition of this "Red Cedar Oil." Maybe the trick is a few drops on a cotton ball, stuck in a corner of the box?

            I like to carve western red cedar (Thuja plicata). My workshop is littered with everything from shake blocks & planks to piles of shavings and sawdust. Just yesterday, I asked guests if they could smell cedar.
            "No. Why? Should we?"
            Even to me, the cedar smell is a fleeting experience = sawdust, fresh cut wet wood. 24 hrs and to me, it's gone. . . . .wondering if I just get used to it.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              Re: Red Cedar oil

              The wood typically used in cedar chests is aromatic cedar not the red cedar you get at the lumberyard. Aromatic cedar will typically maintain its odor. I agree with river-wood dan that a light sanding will bring out the odor but it will diminish over time.

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              • #8
                Re: Red Cedar oil

                Thanks for all the input.
                I am impressed by the knowledge and the willingness to share.
                I will give the "light sanding" a try.
                Ed

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                • #9
                  Re: Red Cedar oil

                  If this is a small area, you can buy aromatic cedar and add it as a veneer. Or you can buy bags of aromatic cedar chips and place them in strategic locations. I use a lot of incense cedar that has it's own unique aroma that is distinctly different from aromatic cedar and western red cedar. I enjoy how each wood species has it's own unique smell, while it's being worked, that can vary, even in the same species, depending on how it's carved and sanded.

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