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Woodcarving - online classes

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  • #16
    Re: Woodcarving - online classes

    Like Rick M, the question is not vague at all, I am one that is interested
    in learning new carving techniques online. The more I see the more I learn.
    Oscar

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    • #17
      Is Chris Pye considered the best for online lessons? I have been carving for about 4 years and I want to learn more and go beyond being a beginner.

      I have seen some great wood carvers on you tube. In the future how can I find a master wood carver to mentor under? My goal is to do at least one fire place mantel like the ones Ron Ramsey and others do.

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      • #18
        I just took a in person class with Alexandre Grabovetskiy in Tampa at the Woodworking School and now signed up for his online classes. Absolutely mind-blowing. https://grabovetskiy.com/school/

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        • #19
          Online classes.....be prepared to do the classwork which takes major time. If you do not do the lessons, it is wasted money. So make sure you make the commitment to carve the objects in order to learn the lessons. Often I find for most people it is not the carving that they need, it is how to get finer details...that is done with drawing classes. What is a drawing class, it is work that teaches you to see details better, teaches you the placement of things more or less within a grid system. To get better results with you carving takes a willingness to do the work. to learn the different kinds of woods, to learn what each tool can be used for....that takes experience and time, and commitment. I feel often if you get the basics down...the rest of it will come with your hard work. Basics come in books and lots of free videos. Classes are great, but the good job comes from a major commitment to moving beyond what you are doing now. And no teacher can help you with that one. I have often read teacher cannot teach you anything, that you're not willing to learn on your own. In my own opinion that is so true...... that coming from someone who has at least five years of college on how to do art. If I had to do it over again.....I say most of it was money flushed down the toilet. Learn the basics, the rest is up to you, find some mentors to chat with.... to help you along the way. Often that is competitive with the best carvers. With wood carving I have found it is the willingness to throw a bad piece in the trash can and do it until you got it down.....that is not always fun nor simple....but it is true learning on how to get better. just my two cents. ....smile.

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          • #20
            Well said Di, and couldn't agree more. I asked a well known carver friend about how to develop one's carving ability, and he gave exactly the same advice. Throw away what doesn't work and keep what does. Yes, it is often hard to throw out something that you've worked hard on, but it's the only way to improve.
            Steve
            Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
            My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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            • #21
              Currently I offer chip carving lessons via a monthly/yearly membership at https://mychipcarving.com/amember/signup. There are 160+ videos and patterns at this time.
              In the not so distant future I plan to offer stand-alone courses as well. I hope this will provide more flexibility for those interested in one particular aspect of chip carving (intro, finishing, rosette carving, etc.)
              What do you think? Is this a good idea to offer stand-alone courses?

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