Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New member with Burl wood questions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New member with Burl wood questions

    Hi, Glad to be here! I am carving a maple wood Burl Tiger Orchid for a jewelry brooch. I finished yhe carving (1st time using Burl) and realized I needed to use wood hardener. I did this and then resanded the brooch using mineral oil and it really did a great job. What I'm wondering is if I need to use an oil base seller bc I used mineral oil? Also any ideas on how I can enhance the center stamina bc right now it just doesn't give the pop I'm looking for
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 1 photos.
    Last edited by Claude; 06-08-2018, 03:21 PM. Reason: corrected typo

  • #2
    I have used DemBart Continental Stock and Checkering oil. It really does a good job hardening the wood when gunsmiths use it on fine line checkering. I have used it a lot on knife handles, and it does a great job of bringing out the grain. I usually sand with 320 or 400 wet when I use it...hope that helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      The wood you are using is maple burl. Beryl is a mineral.

      Comment


      • #4
        "Also any ideas on how I can enhance the center stamina bc right now it just doesn't give the pop I'm looking for"∙∙∙
        A trick I use=
        Go to the hardware store that makes keys, ask them for the filings that are made from the key making progress. add glue to your stamina, sprinkle some of the filings on the glue, let the glue dry, shake off the loose stuff.

        I use Elmer's school glue, drys clear, If I want more sparkle, just add some more glue and filings.
        Last edited by Claude; 06-08-2018, 03:22 PM.
        . . .JoeB

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
          "Also any ideas on how I can enhance the center stamina bc right now it just doesn't give the pop I'm looking for"∙∙∙
          A trick I use=
          Go to the hardware store that makes keys, ask them for the files that are made from the key making progress. add glue to your stamina, sprinkle some of the files on the glue, let the glue dry, shake off the loose stuff.

          I use Elmer's school glue, drys clear, If I want more sparkle, just add some more glue and files.
          Excellent suggestion by Joe! I would have never thought of that. You can also use craft glitter in the same way. It will be much lighter in weight, if that matters. Glitter is available in any craft store.
          Keep On Carvin'
          Bob K.

          My Woodcarving blog: https://www.woodchipchatter.com


          My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


          My RWK Woodcarving Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwkwood


          My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome to the forum!

            Claude
            My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/
            My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/
            My Instagram Page: https://www.instagram.com/claudeswoodcarving/
            My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

            Comment


            • #7
              You have a choice: brass key grindings or craft glitter. Try both on scrap.
              Once a week, one winter, I went to the village hardware store and cleaned out the key-cutting machine.
              By volume, I must have 4+ ounces of brass grindings.

              The brass is nowhere near as glittery as I has hoped.
              Is this where I get to say it was Low Key?
              Also, I think the fresh brass surfaces tarnish and go dull over time.

              Maybe the craft glitter will look to gaudy./glittery. I've never used it.
              Brian T

              Comment


              • #8
                Appreciate the updates. Thanks!!!
                Complete link building service

                Comment


                • #9
                  Welcome to the forum

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X