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  • Good Afternoon!

    Hi, my name is Becky, I live up in Churchill manitoba, and started whittling in November.
    I whittle willows, green, not dried.
    i love whittling and it has helped me so much, health wise!
    I have tons of questions about green wood, so I decided to join this forum!
    Hello everyone!
    This is my Facebook page for anyone who wants to see what I make, to help answer my future questions!
    https://www.facebook.com/BeckyNiedbalka/

  • #2
    Green wood is fun to carve. Welcome to the forum.
    Ed
    Living in a pile of chips.
    https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
    https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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    • #3
      Welcome. Nice to see that you have developed a very attractive style to your work.
      Green willow goes from cheese to bone when it dries. I Iearned not to try to stockpile that wood.
      Polar bears and Snowy Owls, two of my favorite forms.
      Dad was up your way a long while back to visit with the bears.
      Brian T

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      • #4
        Welcome aboard Becky, nice to have another rose amongst us thorns. Looks like you are off to a good start. A question∙∙∙∙ does your green willow do any splitting as it drys?
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          Very nice work Becky and your style is interesting and attractive. Welcome and nice to have more Canadian carvers here.
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #6
            Yes, it tends to split from the round down, I keep it frozen when not using it, and they tend to stop splitting bad after the 4th drying day!
            It's a touch and go which ones split the worst, but nothing has been ruined by it, I find it adds character to each piece.
            I glue the ends of the sleeping wood spirits, but have yet to figure out how to slow the bears top cracking down a bit. No one has conplained yet tho!
            i saw a Doug Linker video in October, and after some 2x4 fails, started using willows. We only have spruce, tamarack and willows up here, so willow was the easier option!
            It is s beautiful, quiet, and serene place to live! I live farther away from the town, out at the cabin area, so much quieter for me, and easy access to the willows!
            Thank you for the warm welcome! I was originally in Facebook groups, but left them due to bullying and no one ever answering my questions. Seems some prefer to keep carving secrets to themselves!

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            • #7
              Hi Becky, you are very Fortunate to find a Style of your own early . It takes some, years before they find the Style that they like . If you have Questions they will be answered here , the Members here love to give Help . Welcome , and if I ever take up Whittling I now know where to go for Answers . Hope you stick around and enjoy your Whittling with us . Merle

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              • #8
                Becky: First Nations carvers in the Pacific Northwest often select Alder as wood for mask carving.
                Many keep the carving in water until they are finished, to keep the fresh wood wet. Soaking should work really well for willow.

                Western red cedar is usually used for the various kinds of poles. Planned to be seen from only one side, the poles are often cut out in the back to reduce some cracking stress. Other times, a single chain saw cut right to the center will work. Even if it does crack, just carve right through it as everybody expects dry wood to crack.

                How might the willow work if you made a single saw cut from the back all the way in to the exact center of the log?
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  I am not sure Brian T, but I have a few unsuitable pieces I can certainly try that on, and leave out to dry un-oiled!
                  I certainly love trying and learning new things!
                  Thank you Merle, I appreciate it! I don't follow directions well, so had to develop my own designs to make life cheaper and easier!
                  Willows up here are super wet, as we have a lot of swamp and tundra moss, so I can keep my pieces outside during winter, and in the freezer come summer!
                  When whittling I can literally see the moisture in the wood being pushed out in front of the knife!
                  I definitely plan on sticking around, and will be reading the entire forum on my rest times!

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                  • #10
                    Becky: back beyond a date of several years ago, you will see that none of the threads have any pictures. Every photo was lost in a monster hack. Recent posts & threads are OK.
                    Brian T

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                    • #11
                      That's good to know!
                      I love that this forum posts pictures! So much easier than blind explanations!

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                      • #12
                        Welcome BeckyN lovely style clean and crisp.

                        Eric

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                        • #13
                          Hello Becky welcome to the forum.
                          Mark N. Akers
                          My Etsy Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KarolinaKarver

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                          • #14
                            Welcome, Becky, it's good to have you with us!
                            Arthur

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                            • #15
                              Thank you Arthur!

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