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  • Paul_Guraedy
    started a topic Barn Owl

    Barn Owl

    The barn owl that I have been working on is approaching the "some assembly required" point. The legs have a final coating of Model Paste. I put it on heavy ~ wait about 15 minutes ~ then use a tooth brush to make the fine feathers found on the owls legs.

    The feet have received a diluted wash of model paste before being painted. I decided to just make the base simple but have not done much with it as yet.

    I the legs end in dowel pins that fit into holes in the base. I will assemble the legs, feet, base by using Apoxy.
    owl back.JPGOwl Face.JPGAttach feet 01.jpgPC130004.JPGPC130001.JPGPC130002.JPG

  • Tinwood
    replied
    Don't know how I missed this but sure glad I eventually got to see it. That is a beautiful piece of work Paul. All those years observing these creatures in their natural habitat as a Ranger has served you well.

    Tinwood

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  • neb
    replied
    Beautiful!

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    Love the owl, Paul!

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Dileon, the watercolor ground is water based and says it can be mixed with other colors. I have not done this but can say that when I want to use watercolor ground to cover another color, I have to be sure and not scrub or the color I am attempting to cover will mix with the ground and defeat my purpose.

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  • Mark N. Akers
    replied
    Paul,great job on carving on the owl,very nice.

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  • Dileon
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul_Guraedy View Post
    I have been asked about my use of the Golden Product "QoR Watercolor Ground". It was recommended to me, by a "flat art" watercolorist, to use in areas of repair, lamination, inserts, etc. where my watercolor paints did not easily match the surrounding non-sealed wood. She uses it to paint on very smooth surfaces. I started slowly and pretty well stuck to these areas.

    The more I use this Ground ~ the more I like the effect. It provides a base for watercolor pigments similar to that of watercolor paper. This is the second piece that I intend to totally cover with Ground before I add color. It will be especially advantageous in areas where I have used Apoxy and Model Paste.

    One thing I have learned, as far as bird feathers are concerned ~ use a flat brush and lay it on heavy. Then use the brush to "pull" the ground into adjacent areas. As the ground dries go back over it with a "dry" brush ~ rinse and dry brush ~ then use it in a "dragging" motion in the direction of the vanes of the feathers. This will accentuate the indentations used in the feathers.

    I did an experiment on a scrap piece of wood and found that it also works for acrylic paints.
    Watercolor Ground.JPG
    I wonder if it would be good for a stain to color of a wood in areas that have glue, Love the way the owl is standing...outstanding work so far!

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  • Brian T
    replied
    It's the bird's behaviour = Barn Owls always look like they tuck their heads down between their shoulder blades.
    You have that "moment in time" that I admire so much in any carving. Don't always get to see it.
    Funny, that and the distinctive face mask is all I need to see.

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Sorry for the slow response on this topic. We have had company for the last couple of weeks and my computer is in our guest bedroom.

    On this carving, I am still only at the "base coat, con sealing" stage ~ but thoroughly enjoying the process. My major regret as I reached the "my traveling days are over" stage of life ~ is that I never made the trip to Idaho to study with Lori Corbett. I am using her instructions in the book, "Illustrated Owl: Barn, Barred & Great Horned: The Ultimate Reference Guide for Bird Lovers, Artists, & Woodcarvers" by Denny Rogers. I do have to translate some of the paints used ~ from acrylic to watercolor. Luckily, long ago, somewhere, I found that Lori Corbett advised, "Pay attention to the pigment information on paints and not the name." This advice has served me well.

    Fortune is smiling! The current copy of, "Wild Fowl Carving" has an article by Jerry Simchuk on painting a barn owl. Using the information from many downloaded photos, Corbett and Simchuk ~ I feel a lot more confident in mixing the colors I need.

    Yesterday, I had an epiphany about the base. I have gone through many concepts and just started using the current chunk of wood simply to hold the owl as I did some assembly. Now, I intend to use it. I am currently gouging out the ends, which I will torch to represent a chunk of wood left over from a forest fire.

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  • pararaptor
    replied
    Do you have a plan for paining it yet?

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  • ka0fan
    replied
    Paul you are a very talented fella--a gifted story teller and wood carver extraordinaire !! All I can say is WOW!! I really like the barn owl you have done a super job on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    I have been asked about my use of the Golden Product "QoR Watercolor Ground". It was recommended to me, by a "flat art" watercolorist, to use in areas of repair, lamination, inserts, etc. where my watercolor paints did not easily match the surrounding non-sealed wood. She uses it to paint on very smooth surfaces. I started slowly and pretty well stuck to these areas.

    The more I use this Ground ~ the more I like the effect. It provides a base for watercolor pigments similar to that of watercolor paper. This is the second piece that I intend to totally cover with Ground before I add color. It will be especially advantageous in areas where I have used Apoxy and Model Paste.

    One thing I have learned, as far as bird feathers are concerned ~ use a flat brush and lay it on heavy. Then use the brush to "pull" the ground into adjacent areas. As the ground dries go back over it with a "dry" brush ~ rinse and dry brush ~ then use it in a "dragging" motion in the direction of the vanes of the feathers. This will accentuate the indentations used in the feathers.

    I did an experiment on a scrap piece of wood and found that it also works for acrylic paints.
    Watercolor Ground.JPG

    Leave a comment:


  • scotia carver
    replied
    Hi Paul
    Nice carving , nice get the info on the model paste and tooth brush technique ,thanks for sharing
    Bruce

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  • squbrigg
    replied
    Ahhh, now I see how you did that. Very cool and imaginative idea. Well done Paul.

    Bob

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Larry the model paste I use is a Golden product. But Artist model paste is available from art supply places and on line. It is easy to use and helps cover up areas of attachment prior to painting.

    Leave a comment:

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