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Painting a Bluegill

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  • Painting a Bluegill

    When painting a Bluegill do most folks use transparent paints?

  • #2
    I don’t paint but this kid does.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ZDyLjGCEfk

    Ed
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
    Local club
    https://www.facebook.com/CentralNebraskaWoodCarvers

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    • #3
      Yes, most people will use the water down paints and then spray a clear gloss finish or spray enamel paint very light. There are a few Youtube videos on how to paint a wooden fish for tips. Thing is there are lots of colors to blend in.

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      • #4
        I use this set of paints because they are artist quality (will not fade & non toxic) and every color can be made from the paints in this set.
        More details here https://goldenpaints.com/products/co...crylic-set-905
        Individual bottles are also available. Because of the high 'pigment' load and excellent binder they can be thinned with water or if very thin coats are needed Golden has mediums to thin as much as necessary. https://goldenpaints.com/products/medium-gels-pastes/fluid-mediums

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        • #5
          Thanks John

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          • #6
            Golden is top-of-the-line artist-quality acrylics...and you pay for it. Do you need it,...no. Yes, it has more pigment but remember this point... all paint is a pigment and a medium. Golden bottles are approximate seven dollars each at Michaels art and up.... Delta, Apple and the other ones are one dollar, the only difference is you may need to add more paint to get the Golden paint ...standard. The only reason to use top-quality paints is if you're doing expensive commission work. Otherwise save you money. I saw a 48 bottle acrylic set for the same price as the ten bottles of Golden bottles. There are a few colors which you have to buy top of line artist paint, but you have to know exactly what color that is, and often today they cost triple or more due to the expensive pigment being used. Unless you need that color ... save that money for something else. Last I looked at some of those colors can cost you 60 dollars a tube or more.
            Last edited by Dileon; 10-07-2021, 05:23 PM.

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            • #7
              I purchased the set of 10 for < $40.00 on Amazon. That is < $5 each.[INDENT]Agreed...'you get what you pay for'.
              Because of my formal training in Studio Arts I choose to use these 'artist grade' paints on canvas or on wood because:
              These are 'lightfast' (ie. they will not fade out in a year). Highly pigmented (as much as 2 times the pigment found it some others) and the quality binder is compatible with all the mediums that allow the painter many options for thinning and finish. They are also 'single pigments' which greatly enhances the mixing ability to create all other possible colors. Cheaper paints; may not be 'lightfast', may not contain single pigments, may contain fillers and mixing the 'highest chroma' colors is not possible with these cheaper multi-pigment paints.
              These 10 colors will easily make all the colors available from all manufacuuresrs and I do not need any more than these 10 paints. https://www.amazon.com/Golden-Fluid-...80410361&psc=1
              For me quality is not expensive it is priceless.

              OBTW Oil paint or oil based finish on top of these paints is OK .... BUT - NEVER put these on top of oil based paints or sealers.
              This is simply my opinion and the reason behind the opinion. I'm sure that other opinions will provide additional valuable insight for you to evaluate to help you make the decision that is best for you. You may find that 5 or 6 bottles of dollar store paint will meet your needs. But, the least expensive option may be a cheap set of watercolor paints sealed with linseed oil.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by johnvansyckel View Post
                I purchased the set of 10 for < $40.00 on Amazon. That is < $5 each.[INDENT]Agreed...'you get what you pay for'.
                Because of my formal training in Studio Arts I choose to use these 'artist grade' paints on canvas or on wood because:
                These are 'lightfast' (ie. they will not fade out in a year). Highly pigmented (as much as 2 times the pigment found it some others) and the quality binder is compatible with all the mediums that allow the painter many options for thinning and finish. They are also 'single pigments' which greatly enhances the mixing ability to create all other possible colors. Cheaper paints; may not be 'lightfast', may not contain single pigments, may contain fillers and mixing the 'highest chroma' colors is not possible with these cheaper multi-pigment paints.
                .
                Sorry folks going to talk artist terminology for one this thread. I have six years of studio art education...top that off in the major in painting, I even make my own paints. Been a professional artist now 50 years. I understand what your talking about, this is a major debate in the art world. Let us restate the question here. It seems that it is simply a question of the definition of “permanent” which leads to the truth of lightfastness. . If we want our work to be as permanent as any work of art ever created, then we should all give up color, take up sculpture, and bury our carvings in the sands of Egypt. Like many artists who want lightfastness, this is a highly questionable subject. Indeed, will a few of our works will survive more than two or three generations???. Can we then define “permanence” as something like this: “no significant change after two hundred years under normal display conditions”? Yes there are additional methods to preserve lightfastness such as uv varnish and more.....

                For any scientific test regimen to be relevant, it must relate to the purpose for which we are measuring. If we accept the foregoing definition, or something similar, as our standard, then the question still remains: Is the test relevant? I assert not, because nobody has offered any evidence that an 800-hour exposure test that is used relates in any way to any definition of “permanence”.

                The starter kit you purchased in Golden is one ounce...five dollars for one ounce. Get two ounces that are ten dollars...not cheap for anyone starting out when a one-dollar two-ounce cheap paint will get them started. I have Golden paints myself in my stack of paint but not my favorite still buy European paints. But I know tons of professional painters who use cheap hobby paint because of all the questions above. Plus they do not want to mess around with the headache of professional mixing color...which mind you know you often can not get the colors you need by mixing the ten-odd selection Golden has given you. You need other pigments.

                I come from the train of thought that yes if you going pro then buy Golden. But when I teach first-year students that are not artists yet, we are going to learn the ropes first, student grade paint is fine if you do not know how to mix. If a student decides to become an artist then lightfastness can matter and worth the cost if you think your work may be museum material. As noted this is all debate material in the art world...so everyone has an opinion. But the real truth in lightfastness, testing, and chemistry is still under research...As others have stated, art color does fade with time, work does not last unless you have museum restoration.

                Beyond this, people on here spend tons of money on good wood carving tools, if beginning in painting their wood should be student grade to see if they enjoy and want to move on to higher levels of painting. Yes my opinion of one of the thousands but... If they do that one..then the progression of cost and better paints should be ok. I know most well-known woodcarvers who sell painting wood carving do not use top of the line paints. It is more of an artist war instead.

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                • #9
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-hd2iwByLg Here is a good start from Gene Messer on the fish transparent painting of course you would not be using his acrylic colors. . You tube

                  This is the preferred method of fish paintings by spray but you do not have to spray just blend. It shows you how to do the colors and one major thing is using pearl paints on fish if you like the effect. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiXR83b2LY4
                  Last edited by Dileon; 10-08-2021, 11:36 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Dileon

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