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Red-billed or yellow-billed hornbill patterns

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  • Danibeth
    replied
    Thank you Glenn for the advice. It is greatly appreciated.

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Danibeth,
    The way I try to get proportions right is to look at each segment of the carving as a percentage of the whole piece. To assist you one way is to blow the pictures up to the size you want to use then use a transperant tracing paper that has squares printed all over it. a bird beak might be 6 squares long and 1.5 high the head 18 squares wide and 25 high. From that you can measure your carving to see if the proportions are correct simply using dividers on the picture and relating the measurement to the work. Cutting bits of the picture out and layingit on the work can work for you as well.

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  • Danibeth
    replied
    Thanks y'all!

    Thanks for the link sappy!

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  • Claude
    replied
    Originally posted by Danibeth View Post
    ...
    With decoy carving, I have patterns for cutting the top and side views from a block of wood. I can print a picture and trace the pattern on a piece of wood to make the side profile of the bird to cut out. Not a problem. I have done that with silhouette decoys I have made. However, I'd like the hornbill to be 3D so how do I make sure the front or top profiles I find in pictures are the correct proportion in relation to the side views?
    ...
    Use a photo editing app such as PhotoShop Elements, or another, to adjust the image size to the same dimensions. For example, if the head top view is 4 inches long and the side view is 3 inches long, you can reduce the top view to 3 inches, or you can increase the side view to 4 inches long. If you don't want to pay for PSE, there are free apps available that work quite well. Here is a discussion about this: https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...esizing-sticky and there are others.

    Claude

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  • Nebraska
    replied
    Originally posted by Danibeth View Post
    Or is there a link that explains that process in a thread somewhere that I missed or didn't use the correct search terms for?

    Thanks
    I look for a profile and a head on photo. Now I carve people not animals but I use common reference points like tip of nose to crease where upper and lower lips meet. Enlarge or reduce one photo angle to match to wood to be used then scale the second photo to match the first. (Hint, If you measure in CM it is easier to calculate scale.) I used the photo copier function on my printer to enlarge or reduce. Hope this makes sense. Pallin is right once you learn this skill you have a pattern for anything you can find photos of and the world is your oyster.

    B9F4B80C-AC40-40C6-B707-DE12CEB46E51.jpg EFA6CA9D-5EE3-4943-9A19-59D4EE543817.jpg
    Last edited by Nebraska; 07-27-2022, 10:54 AM.

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  • sappy
    replied
    I don't know if this helps, but I did find this pattern, https://hummul.com/great-hornbill-perching-1-3-size/

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  • Danibeth
    replied
    Or is there a link that explains that process in a thread somewhere that I missed or didn't use the correct search terms for?

    Thanks

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  • Danibeth
    replied
    Thanks Merle. I appreciate that help.

    I understand the using the importance of using pictures for carving, especially when it comes to details and where something belongs on a bird/animal. I even started by looking at my pictures that I took as well as google images online but I don't know how to make sure I have the right proportions from multiple different photos, especially taken by multiple different people. I had either straight on side shots or slightly angled side shots from the birds I saw. No straight up from the bottom or straight from the front shots.

    With decoy carving, I have patterns for cutting the top and side views from a block of wood. I can print a picture and trace the pattern on a piece of wood to make the side profile of the bird to cut out. Not a problem. I have done that with silhouette decoys I have made. However, I'd like the hornbill to be 3D so how do I make sure the front or top profiles I find in pictures are the correct proportion in relation to the side views?

    Like I said, shouldn't be an issue with the blacksmith lapwing because the pictures I took of the birds are at the same magnification and pretty much the same distance. I already know the proportions are mostly correct for the multiple positions I have of the bird. Plus the lapwing bill is not nearly as complicated as a hornbill bill, so I don't need to stress as much. The other thing was I was going to carve the lapwing more as a "functional" decoy than as super realistic, so being off a little with the bill isn't as detrimental.

    The hornbill, I'd love to carve a little more realistically...likely won't carve in the feather families but I do want to get the head looking "right". So, I need to make sure the proportions are "right".

    Thanks for y'alls help again.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nebraska
    replied
    Originally posted by Danibeth View Post
    HMMMMMMMMM I have two notifications that folk have responded to this thread, but when I click to view those responses I get a notice saying that I am not authorized to view that. When I come directly to the thread, there do not appear to be any responses to my query.

    Any help for what I am doing wrong?

    Nebraska was apparently one of the responders.
    May have been me I posted, then thought since I’m not a bird guy maybe I should mind my own business. Basically the same advice as pallin gave

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  • pallin
    replied
    A simple computer search (Bing or Google) brings up dozens of images. Going from photos to a pattern is one skill you need as a woodcarver. It trains your mind as to how to visually sort out the details of the subject. This becomes valuable for visualizing the subject while carving.
    Last edited by pallin; 07-26-2022, 03:06 PM.

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  • Claude
    replied
    Just Google "african hornbill", then click on Images at top of page. Find the appropriate photos, then print them out, or sketch the outline shape of one directly on the wood.

    Claude

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  • Merle Rice
    replied
    Hi, Danibeth, I think you need to Sign in Again. That happened to me last Week and that is what I needed to do . Hope this helps. Merle

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  • Danibeth
    replied
    HMMMMMMMMM I have two notifications that folk have responded to this thread, but when I click to view those responses I get a notice saying that I am not authorized to view that. When I come directly to the thread, there do not appear to be any responses to my query.

    Any help for what I am doing wrong?

    Nebraska was apparently one of the responders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Danibeth
    started a topic Red-billed or yellow-billed hornbill patterns

    Red-billed or yellow-billed hornbill patterns

    Any idea on where I might be able to find patterns for african hornbill varieties?

    I'd also love to find a pattern for a blacksmith lapwing I think, though I think that I can make my own from some pictures I took. I think. Not so much on the hornbills.

    Thanks a lot y'all!

    Danibeth
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