Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need perspective...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need perspective...

    ...I've been carving faces for a while now. I have been trying to develop a technique and style that would yield consistent results. I feel like I'm going nowhere. I pretty much use the steps from SharonMYART Guide to Wood Carving Faces. I know I don't do the same angles on the same cuts every time. I'm not looking for detailed faces, i.e. facial features carved as seen in real life...just a caricature style that I can call my own to some degree. I just feel lost sometimes.

    I thought I would take a pic of each carving's face and compare them but that would take a lot of time and effort. So, I thought I would stack the carvings up with the faces visible, take a pic, crop the photo, and see if it would help.

    Honest thoughts and or criticism from fresh eyes.

    Thanks
    BobL DSC04478.JPG
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Just Carving; 01-03-2021, 12:34 PM. Reason: Changed to "Guide to Wood Carving Faces" from "Carving a little person"

  • #2
    Putting these all together was a good idea. I'm thinking you are not wanting every little person to look like the next, just the style of carving. Look at the noses, how many resemble. Look at the rounded cheeks and the pouty bottom lips. I'm thinking you HAVE a style. These are nice little carvings, just enough uniqueness to be individual, but enough similarity to be family.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bob,

      Not my style of carving so not going to be able to offer technical advice. I took a looked at SMA’s work online and compared to your photo.

      I think you are stopping before you’re done. Example one of your guys wearing a hard hat and jacket with his hands in the pockets. I don’t see the pocket opening and I see a zipper line on the jacket but it seems vague.

      I see depressions for eye sockets on your work but no eye details.

      ​​​​​​​Lastly what bings her work together and adds details not actually carved is the paint. Which you have chosen not to do?

      Those are my observations, hope you find them helpful.
      Ed
      Living in a pile of chips.
      https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
      https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

      Comment


      • #4
        As Popeye used says...."I Y'am what I y'am!" Looking at all 28-faces I'd say that is your style!

        Comment


        • #5
          Bob, you have a lot of good looking faces there, I would suggest you check out some other carvers videos, and eventually you will combine the features you like , and come up with your own little mix. Sharon’s method is basically the way Jack Price teaches his style.
          If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

          www.spokanecarvers.com

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with Tom, look at your work, decide issues you would like to change, and then go out and find some carving more to your liking, and change that one thing. For example, you do not like the nose, then go out find a nose you do like and try to make the nose like that photo or video, want better eyes then do the same thing. Pretty soon you get results more toward the direction you want to go.

            Comment


            • #7
              You might want to look at Kevin Coates for an example of how to carve faces. Here is link to one of his videos on carving a fisherman. Doug Linker is another carver that I found helpful.
              Rodster
              https://rodster.ca

              Comment


              • #8
                You are missing the details. Look at your carvings. Which one is sad, happy, mad? What are you trying to convey in the carving? Look in the mirror...smile, exaggerate a smile. What do you see around your eyes, the corner of the mouth, the facial muscles that scream “I’m smiling!” then when you carve exaggerate those characteristics even further.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I hear ya brother. I'm in the same position. I just keep studying the info that Pinterest post to their site and try to learn something new that I can use to improve by carving skills
                  . . .JoeB

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you everyone! I think the big takeaway for me is to take a good hard look at what I have done, finish what needs to be finished, and decide what I want to keep and what I should change. I did go back and lookout MySharon Art videos which I haven't looked at in a while. I now realize what I haven't been doing and should have been. I guess this is what happens when you are looking at too many different ways to carve faces--basically, I got lost and confused in all the info out there.

                    Thanks again!

                    BobL

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bob, perhaps Jack Price's book: https://www.foxchapelpublishing.com/...s-in-wood.html would help. Also check out Gene Messer's carving the Jack Price 35 MM Canister Figure on YouTube.

                      Neil
                      http://www.tristatecarvers.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neil A. Ward View Post
                        Bob, perhaps Jack Price's book: https://www.foxchapelpublishing.com/...s-in-wood.html would help. Also check out Gene Messer's carving the Jack Price 35 MM Canister Figure on YouTube.

                        Neil
                        Great suggestion! I learned carving faces using Jack's face stick method! It works! My style is a hybrid of Jack Price and Mike Shipley.

                        Also have carved using Pete LeClair's face method...it is intuitive, and lends itself to more detail.
                        Last edited by tbox61; 01-04-2021, 11:46 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks! I'll check them out.

                          BobL

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree with the above comments - particularly Dileon's of taking it one step at a time: fix one thing you don't like, then another...

                            Claude
                            My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                            My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                            My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks Claude. It is a good suggestion.

                              BobL

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X