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Meet Bathrobe Bernie

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  • Meet Bathrobe Bernie

    I saw an editorial cartoon that I thought would be fun to try as a carving. It was a great learning experience to work it out in my head since I didn’t have a side view to work off. Now I want to work on incorporating more movement into my next piece!

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    Always covered in chips.

  • #2
    That's great. I feel exactly like that, some mornings. My bathrobe is green.
    Just finished a load of laundry (pyjamas).
    Ought to be good for clothes for 2 weeks now.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      I love him! and i got a good chuckle, nice work Jersey!
      Herb

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      • #4
        The hair really "top" it off, good work gal
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          That is an absolute rip! certainly brought a smile to my face.

          Comment


          • #6
            Your selection of a Carving Project that is going to make you think is a Side of this Hobby that's makes it Challenging , Satisfying , Fun and Accomplishment . Very Well Done . Merle

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            • #7
              Thanks for all the supportive comments. You guys are the best!
              Always covered in chips.

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              • #8
                I really like the fellow, Jersey, and nice adaptation.
                Bill
                Living among knives and fire.

                http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                • #9
                  Nice bit of fun well executed. Sure made me smile hehehehe.

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                  • #10
                    Nice one, Jersey!

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                    My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                    My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                    • #11
                      Oh boy, this is a smile starter!

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                      • #12
                        Chris Hammack has a rough out for that sort of pose. His rough out can be made into an old man, or an old woman. https://www.chrishammackart.com/full...randma-grandpa The site says it's currently sold out, but I think it's popular enough he'll get more.

                        Claude
                        My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                        My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                        My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Claude View Post
                          Chris Hammack has a rough out for that sort of pose. His rough out can be made into an old man, or an old woman. https://www.chrishammackart.com/full...randma-grandpa The site says it's currently sold out, but I think it's popular enough he'll get more.

                          Claude
                          Good to know, Claude thanks! I’m waiting for the book “Thinking Inside the Roughout.” I haven’t used one yet but I know it will help save my hands. We have a band saw so I just need to learn how to transfer my own design into a roughout. I’m three-dimensionally challenged but it will come eventually I’m sure.
                          Always covered in chips.

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                          • #14
                            To do your own design, I'd suggest these steps.
                            1. Sketch front and side views on the same piece of paper (easier to match up key points on the drawings, such as nose, belt, elbows, etc.
                            2. Using your computer, adjust the size of the drawings to an appropriate size, such as 6 inch tall figure, or 3 inch wide figure (to match the available wood), etc.
                            3. Transfer the pattern to the block of wood, using graphite paper (not carbon paper), by tracing around the outline of the sketch. Do this for the front and side views both.
                            4. Cut out on the bandsaw, staying 1/8 inch or so outside the pattern to allow for minor changes as you are carving. IMPORTANT: NEVER BACK OUT OF A CUT WITH THE BANDSAW RUNNING - You're almost guaranteed to pull the blade off the wheels and break it. I turn bandsaw off and use a small dowel to press against the teeth of the blade to hold it in place while I wiggle the block around to back it out.
                            4a. You can cut waste wood completely off front view, say, and then tape it back on with masking tape so you can cut the other view.
                            4b. You can stop your cut about 1/8 inch short and then back the blade out of the cut - no tape required...
                            Personally, I usually do 4a, as the outline of many of my carvings have tight turns and it is difficult to back out.

                            Claude
                            My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                            My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                            My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks Claude! Very helpful advice.
                              Always covered in chips.

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