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What Did It Sell For?

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  • #16
    Well it didn’t sell for anything lol. My wife signed me up for what she thought was an out door art n craft fair, but it turned out to be a vintage market with most people trying to sell junk they found at the dump. We didn’t sell anything, not one of my paintings or carving, even my wife’s necklaces or bracelets, we also had some of the wild mushrooms we harvest, but nothing sold. I guess it was a good learning experience, and I got hangers on most of my pieces so I can start bringing them to a few galleries that have been asking for some of my work
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    • #17
      Better luck next time! My wife and I participated in number of craft fairs years ago when we were potters (long story why we are no longer in that fine craft). I found them to be a lot of fun, and we sold quite a bit, even though there were other potters selling also.

      What set us apart from the others was that they all were selling pottery that was more pleasing to other potters than to Joe and Jane Public, and was more expensive, whereas we had smaller and less expensive items that were usable (as opposed to merely decorative) and in glazes more attuned to the public's taste than to artists' tastes. We usually outsold them all.

      Takeaway lesson: Sell what the public wants and can afford with discretionary funds, not what you like. Free advice, worth every penny
      !
      Arthur

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
        Better luck next time! My wife and I participated in number of craft fairs years ago when we were potters (long story why we are no longer in that fine craft). I found them to be a lot of fun, and we sold quite a bit, even though there were other potters selling also.

        What set us apart from the others was that they all were selling pottery that was more pleasing to other potters than to Joe and Jane Public, and was more expensive, whereas we had smaller and less expensive items that were usable (as opposed to merely decorative) and in glazes more attuned to the public's taste than to artists' tastes. We usually outsold them all.

        Takeaway lesson: Sell what the public wants and can afford with discretionary funds, not what you like. Free advice, worth every penny
        !
        Arthur I will take your advice, criticism, ect anytime, much appreciated! I guess non of the other vendors sold much except for our friends young daughter. She makes designer pillows with cats, dogs, or other animals. She made over $1,000 after all her and parents expenses. Not bad for a 13 year old.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post
          Better luck next time! My wife and I participated in number of craft fairs years ago when we were potters (long story why we are no longer in that fine craft). I found them to be a lot of fun, and we sold quite a bit, even though there were other potters selling also.

          What set us apart from the others was that they all were selling pottery that was more pleasing to other potters than to Joe and Jane Public, and was more expensive, whereas we had smaller and less expensive items that were usable (as opposed to merely decorative) and in glazes more attuned to the public's taste than to artists' tastes. We usually outsold them all.

          Takeaway lesson: Sell what the public wants and can afford with discretionary funds, not what you like. Free advice, worth every penny
          !
          Yep, nice summary. I'd add to market to the upper class rather than the lower class. I've found it is easy if you do quality work...
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #20
            Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post

            Yep, nice summary. I'd add to market to the upper class rather than the lower class. I've found it is easy if you do quality work...
            I as well, there’s alot cheep stuff out there. You can go to hobbie lobby and get “art” and carving for practically free. I do think it’s funny that most of the pieces people will go crazy over are pieces I spent the least time on and are my least favorite.q

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            • #21
              Originally posted by woodburner807 View Post

              Yep, nice summary. I'd add to market to the upper class rather than the lower class. I've found it is easy if you do quality work...
              Can't argue with that since the more affluent have more discretionary funds available.
              Arthur

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Arthur C. View Post

                Can't argue with that since the more affluent have more discretionary funds available.
                And you will make more carving commission work than spec work. I know a carver that carves professionally. He gets the cost of materials up front then 1/2 the labor when he's 1/2 done carving and the final 1/2 upon delivery and installation. Some folks don't like the 1%-ers, but they can pay the freight without blinking an eye.

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