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Giving credit to a carver......

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  • Giving credit to a carver......

    Recently while surfing Pinterest I have seen carvings posted with web sites listed that do not belong to the carver. Most of these sites offer something free (at least it appears so). One thing they do offer is pages of rules for using the site that address copyright violation. This is happening to me, and I was wondering if anyone else has noticed this about their works. Some of my work is being used as "CLICK BAIT" to access these sites. Most recently, woodworkingprojects4beginners.com

  • #2
    I have not personally had this happen, but some of the woodworkers I like to watch on various media consistently complain of these sites stealing plans and selling them, copying other's work and the like.
    Just recently I posted a carving on a Facebook carving group that has since been shared, but apparently if you share some one else's work you can hide who you are and where you have shared it so I'm wondering by who and where my carving has been posted?
    Maybe the answer is to stop posting our work, but I know I enjoy seeing other's work.

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    • #3
      I really only mention this because someone can put a copyright on your work and could prevent you from using your own work.

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      • #4
        The internet is the new "Wild West!" There's so much fraud and infringement going on that if you're not one of the major players like Disney, YouTube...etc., it's best not to post anything that you don't want copied. Just ask some of these celebrities who now forever occupy a space on the internet in their birthday suits. Unless you've got lots of money and a good copyright lawyer it's almost impossible to stop. Those of us who have created works that we intend to sell should probably wait to post them for general viewing until we're all sold out.

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        • #5
          Last year I found an ETSY account that had copied a photo from my blog and reproduced it in a sterling silver locket and was selling them. After communicating with her that I wanted at least mention as the carver whose work was used, and getting no where, I had some fun with it. I borrowed attorney letterhead from a retired attorney friend with his blessing and sent a very legal worded letter along with an invoice for $500. Still no word, but she did pull the item in question from her web site and ETSY.

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          • #6
            Copyright claim jumping? Not in Canada.
            From the moment of creation, I hold all copy rights over whatever I create.
            Some of the financial penalties are nearly automatic with very little needed on my part.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              My experience shows it isn't worth worrying about it very much because the small guy can't afford the legal fees necessary to address copyright violations. Violations often come up on my writing forums, art painting forums, wood-burning forums, etc. You need deep pockets to pursue any legal action.

              However, if you create something that is a derivative of a logo, image or product the big companies will go after you. Even on a wood-burning forum, someone did a crude interpretation of a Disney character and Disney jump right on them.

              Nothing is fair anymore and honor systems don't work all the time. So, I don't put anything on the web that I care about and keep all other items to myself. BTW, writing is probably the most pirated media out there.
              Bill
              Living among knives and fire.

              http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                Copyright claim jumping? Not in Canada.
                From the moment of creation, I hold all copy rights over whatever I create.
                Some of the financial penalties are nearly automatic with very little needed on my part.
                This would argue for documenting the date you create something. It may be necessary to prove precedence.

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                • #9
                  Back in the day and time when it mattered, I usually snail-mailed things to myself and didn't open the envelopes.
                  When I see a print and I can hold the photographic negative for that print, it's really mine.
                  Brian T

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                  • #10
                    Hmmm? ,,,,,,,,,,,,
                    Ed
                    Living in a pile of chips.
                    https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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