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Cleaned up a Rose Root

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  • Cleaned up a Rose Root

    Found wood is fun indeed. Sometimes it is just a small size for another project - glue on or add to... I was working in the garden - have acres - and came across a dead Rose. It is bad for a mowing machine to hit - so I used my tractor to dig it out. Once out, I decided to see if I could use it for something. I set it in the hot Texas sun to help kill off what was attacking it or living in it. I then washed it for a second or third time - left it in the rain and sun. I decided it wasn't for a project, but would sit behind one. It will be a 'fallen tree' in a mini scene. I was in the shop and came across a wedge of tree - from cutting down a Catalpa tree. The carvers around here use it like basswood. It is a fisherman's delight when living - caterpillars like the tree. Time will tell on it.
    So consider all sorts of tree/bush wood for carving. Martin

  • #2
    Sounds cool but pictures tell a thousand words. Just sayin'

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    • #3
      Thanks Spritwolfe - I think a 90mm (to use metric) 25mm=1inch (more or less) wood cutter, chopper, Viking or such would be best. The block height is about that high but "MA" there with her axe is even taller but would work - it is a limb to her and a log to the short wood cutter. So some chunks of root or limb can be made into a scene. OBTW, MA is just about 100 years old. Carved by my Great Uncle Martin (Namesake) in his Dr. office with sharp knives. The paint is Oil. Art stores had oils then. (likely drug store). I have three in that set that I'm in the process of fixing since we lost a rifle and a dog 50 years ago in a move. So now a first try rifle and dog are with them. Second generation will take place once I gain more skill. Hope the picture comes out ok.

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      • #4
        A hundred years old? Most interesting.
        Sorry about your dog. That's tough.
        Good luck with your project.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the thought, I'm in the process of doing another big dog for another set I'm making and the prototype dog came out reasonable so now for the Black wood - Ebony! Yea. Dog will have a White tail and white inside ears. Still considering other items. The prototype dog was in old (ugh) pine that the pitch was getting hard. Wife liked the shape so I'm good to go on another set. Finally getting back into carving with a 60 year stay away due to being overseas and busy on the job. I wished I had kept up with it during the long weeks overseas training and helping companies come up to speed learning the languages of software and Test. Might have met someone in France or Korea..... World response team member. Martin

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          • #6
            Are you going to carve ebony with hand tools?
            Good luck with that. It will dull down your blades very quickly.
            Good luck as the same

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            • #7
              My reverse tooth hand saw had a slight job cutting and I was a bit tired after working on that. I tried my pro knife an yes I can slice a corner as before but more than that takes real work. It is a very dense wood. I have a power carver and a new motor drive to drive it. My Big one is too big. I'll use it to cut and grind. Smaller will be carving. Dried yellow pine is tough and that is hard enough. Finished my prototype dog and painted it. Hope to have a video on the carving process, not to teach but to show major steps. Great teachers on web. Martin

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lionslair View Post
                My reverse tooth hand saw had a slight job cutting and I was a bit tired after working on that. I tried my pro knife an yes I can slice a corner as before but more than that takes real work. It is a very dense wood. I have a power carver and a new motor drive to drive it. My Big one is too big. I'll use it to cut and grind. Smaller will be carving. Dried yellow pine is tough and that is hard enough. Finished my prototype dog and painted it. Hope to have a video on the carving process, not to teach but to show major steps. Great teachers on web. Martin
                There's a HUGE difference between carving yellowed pine and ebony. The only problem with learning to carve on excessively hard wood is you don't learn as much since you will dull down your blades so fast; perhaps even ruin them. You'd be best off using your power tools for this type of wood.
                Also your chances of cutting yourself increase greatly with extremely dense wood.
                For a truly enjoyable carving experience I'd choose a different type of wood altogether.
                Bass , Tupelo, Poplar, Cottonwood, butternut

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                • #9
                  I have a couple of local brothers (not related) and one tried to carve ebony and ended up grinding it all the way. He does canes. The other, golf balls. Go figure. Three types of carving in 3 men.
                  I have my power carver working now - had to buy a motor for it as it was not heavy duty. So now I have two big motors - one to 'turn cut' [tornado cutters and diamonds ... ] and the other mostly the carver but could handle multiple jobs. Martin - back to where a knife cuts wood.

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                  • #10
                    image.jpeg There's nothing wrong with carving hardwood.
                    Ive carved Brazillian cherry wood, Canary wood, Wenge, Zebra wood , Purple Heart, Pau Ferro BUT most of the carving is done with powering tools.
                    image.jpeg

                    I have successfully manually carved some of these woods BUT have dulled a ruined a blade or two.
                    image.jpeg
                    Its a challenge and I'll still do it BUT I find poplar , maple and bass wood nicer to carve manually , plus it was super fun and I learned so much.

                    image.jpeg

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                    • #11
                      I always admired the carving done in the south seas of the Pacific ocean. Natives using metal taken from the waters of war time and working it into knives and axes... Some of the nice work was upon various hardwoods in small trees or large bushes as well as what floats in and coconuts shells. Heads out of them were made for 'effect'. Naturally some made spears with carving both for war and for fishing. I spent two years down there and my parents over 11. One of our brave 400 families was a carver and I have a face in a chunk of drift wood. I like what you have done and really like the rocking horse. I think that size might be on my list to do for Christmas. Still working on my first two YouTube shows - both teaching basics and a third as show and tell. I was carving up an example how-to-do-it dog that my dad sawed out of Redwood. That was nice to carve. It looks good also. Martin

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                      • #12
                        I finally got my 2006 1/3hp Foredom up and running - broken shaft - and now have a 1/16. The 1/3 is for grinding / using carbide rotary barbs and I bought a 1/4" quad end-mill (metal cutting machine...) that has a plunge cut and other angles to 90 for planing the surface smooth. Having a Mill in the shop points me to more toys. The 1/16 has a carver/engraver tool (pound shapes into material) and a number of cutters for it to power carve (lighter material.) I've made two good dogs - have three in three stages and two types of dog that I'm getting ready for YouTube. I'll keep the group up on the carbide Mill, can be High speed steel and cobalt hard. (M42 is best) Great for Rosewoods I suspect. Carbide tends to have blunter edges. Many towns have stores and supplies that sell them. I use MSCdirect myself. [on-off for 20 years]. A big project I'm getting back on is my Rhino. An unicorn [Indian] Rhino. I will do as I did years ago - I had used fruit carton wood - wonderful to carve [slats] - for many things [free] and put my old Rhino in that. Now, it being lost, I'm doing it again in 1/4" x 9each Basswood slices. It will be about 8" long ! I have other projects out of solid wood. This will be an experience. Just talked to my son - he seems to be interested. Time will tell. A lot of research went into how they walked. Rhino's are so primitive that they bound, use same and opposite side leg movement. The best I saw was one side - legs almost touching, leaning into them as being rammed by another! Two battle tanks. Martin

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                        • #13
                          The 1/4" solid carbide endmill was a working wonder. A bit of to much to almost handle - 1" of sharp turning material that cuts steel without a thought. It was a matter of speed and how to hold the handle and the wood. Best to have the wood held in a vice or clamp and use hands to steer. I think next time a 1/4x1/4 square round would be good for most things. Not much planing of wood is needed - mostly shaping and cutting down in small areas. End mills can be purchased in most large or medium towns in tool stores or from MSCdirect.com or others. The difference between wood carbide and metal carbide is about 4 grades of 2x a step of hardness maybe 8 times harder. Rosewood has silicon dioxide (sand) within. Martin

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