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  • Identify this tree

    We were on the river, and found a lil forest of these non native trees. I would love to carve the wood, but not sure the species, can anyone identify it. My hubby says theg have only been up here for almost 50 yrs, they came up with flood waters.
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  • #2
    Looking at the buds in particular, coming up in flood waters, I'll guess Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera) . Very similar to Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) , so common in river bottoms further south like at my place (53N). I expect that the wood will be very soft, featureless and quite hairy/stringy/wispy awkward to finish. Black cottonwoods here are common for the chainsaw carving crowd. After the carving dries, you burn off the fuzzies with a bottle torch.





    Brian T

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    • #3
      Ah, can I carve it green I wonder? Might cut a test piece and try a lil polar bear!
      thanks Brian T, I know there is cottenwood south of us, I was told it was birch from some up here, but I said I didn't think so.
      i know that the leaves go super yellow in fall, and the branches go straight up. I wish I had taken a picture of the area, there are almost a hundred there, but not super tall of a tree. Its accessible only in winter.

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      • #4
        If the spring buds go sticky, it's Balsam, Black further south.
        Cut a typical one and drag it home. Clip a bunch of 12" - 16" twigs and put them in a jar of water.
        They should have broken dormancy by now, the buds should get going and begin to open up.
        In wet sand, you might even get rooting that you can plant.
        Brian T

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        • #5
          Awesome! Up here nothing grows until june, we have pretty late springs, but I would love to grow some in my yard!
          the buds were sticky when we cut the tree a few weeks ago. Sappy type sticky.
          off to find a big jar!

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          • #6
            My guess is some variety of poplar.

            06AE50DD-AA19-4EF3-A6C6-00B9FF5E6A14.jpeg AB4FEBC0-AF83-4B6E-926B-8290931A83C3.jpeg ​​​​​​​
            Ed
            Living in a pile of chips.
            https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
            https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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            • #7
              Thanks Ed! I am going to do some research on both and see the downsides to the wood!

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              • #8
                The May long weekend is almost a risk of frost here.
                Churchill must have a much shorter season than even we do.
                If you can get some rooted cuttings now, they ought to be good to plant out in late June.
                That tree should be easy carving green.

                I start grape vine cuttings outdoors in potting soil in late April. I need to see buds to figure out what's dead and alive. They can go into the ground in late July and usually make it through the first winter OK. Only thing that I've ever done where the garbage (prunings) has value.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  I have used poplar for several recent relief carvings. It was purchased at a Big Box Store, so it's been kiln dried and milled.

                  DN10b.jpg
                  Here is a link to an entire project done in poplar:

                  Pacific Northwest Style Dogs (repost) - Woodcarving Illustrated
                  Last edited by pallin; 02-19-2021, 08:26 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Here's a web site that might help you: http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/factsheets.cfm

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                    My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                    My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pallin View Post
                      I have used poplar for several recent relief carvings. It was purchased at a Big Box Store, so it's been kiln dried and milled.

                      DN10b.jpg
                      Here is a link to an entire project done in poplar:

                      Pacific Northwest Style Dogs (repost) - Woodcarving Illustrated
                      That looks awesome!

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Claude!

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