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leylandii wood knot problem

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  • #16
    It's good that you have found a stock of wood, but remember that it will change in texture and hardness as it dries out. Put a sealer on the ends and store it in your shed if you can. The warmth and sunlight will make it dry and split faster. It can feel like a complete change in as little as a few weeks, and once it dries out, it may not work at all for carving. Take especially good care of the larger/thicker pieces. Those will dry slower, and you might be able to split them and get several carvings out of them. Again, seal all exposed ends as soon as possible.

    Good luck.

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    • #17
      Great advice DL. Thank you.

      I do not have any space in the shed right now, so will have to clear out when the weather gets dryer, and then will need prepare the woods. All the old woods left in the garden for last 2-3 years have been cracked badly, so not carving worthy at all. So yes the new ones need to go into the shed with wax on both cut ends with priority.

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      • #18
        Did some more carving tonight. Trying to refine nose and eyes.
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        • #19
          More refining. I am lost what to do for the top of the head bit. But this Leylandii wood is OK for carving. Not too hard, and not too soft. Knots were not too critical problem as mallet gouges were able to remove most of them.
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          Last edited by kiri; 05-23-2017, 02:12 PM.

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          • #20
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            • #21
              I was just reading through some posts and found this one, so once again, late to the party. I really like these two carvings. I love the use of the grain with the one, adds so much interest. While I like them the way they are, I was wondering if you had considered rounding off the top of the head. I notice you have taken the forehead back a little on one, and that looks very nice.

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              • #22
                I spotted this thread while researching whether Leylandii is suitable for carving or turning. The rather unpromising looking logs concealed some very attractive timber. I might follow up on the offer of some weathered logs. Thanks for posting these photo's, and congratulations on the results.

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