Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Carving wood from fresh cut Birch Tree

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    the article can be found in summer 2018 issue 83 woodcarving magazine page 22. Karen Henderson from St. Francis Minn. has several good hints and tips in the short highly descriptive article. she uses several types of wood but sees to it that they are all fresh green and kept wet. or wet and frozen.
    Denny

    photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

    Comment


    • #17
      Here are some faces carved in green birch. I found it too hard to carve comfortably when dry but not bad while still green. These pieces were cut in the spring and were actually too wet to carve for a couple of weeks.

      Joe

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
        Going by global distribution of species, I think you have Betula pendula = the European White Birch.
        After you top it, we would drop the whole trunk and buck it up into pieces on the ground.
        100 - 200 cm pieces would be fine material for a cane or a hiking stick with all the carvings that you can think of!
        Work it green and wet and shave it down to appropriate sizes.
        You will have some fun carving that wood fresh.

        One big difference with our B. papyrifera is the working quality of the bark for bushcraft.
        Splitting into layers then bending and folding can be done but ours is very easily formed.
        Thanks, Brian, and I was wondering if it was white birch, although there are many variants. I've never worked with white birch but years ago I did a little work with "regular" (river?) birch and my uncle did a lot of woodturning using it. Beautiful stuff.

        Other than cutting some white birch, never knew it could be nice to carve.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

        Comment


        • #19
          Of real tree size, there are half a dozen different birch species across Canada. Betula papyrifera is by far the most common.
          I don't even know if there's any other, as far west in the mountains as I live.

          I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks in seasoned birch. Sure, it's stiff. Dry wood. Teak or Ebony or Mahogany it ain't.
          Beautiful, aromatic, straight-grained and knot free. Everything you could ask for.
          I use it for adze handles as well.

          AdzesB.JPG
          Brian T

          Comment


          • #20
            incredibly beautiful and functional custom work there RV
            Denny

            photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

            Comment


            • #21
              where do i learn how to wrap with cord like that?
              Denny

              photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

              Comment


              • #22
                I'll find the old pictures. I did it before the hack. I'll start a new thread. Technically simple.
                The same trick to wrapping the feet of the guides when you build a fishing rod.

                Looks can be deceptive:
                The upper break from yellow to black on the elbow adze actually marks the Holm Constant for best hand position!
                The yellow is #18 nylon surveyor's cord from a hardwae store. The black is #18 tarred nylon seine cord from a chandler.
                The cord is pulled so tight that you would see the pattern crushed into the surface of the birch.
                Brian T

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by JoeVM View Post
                  Here are some faces carved in green birch. I found it too hard to carve comfortably when dry but not bad while still green. These pieces were cut in the spring and were actually too wet to carve for a couple of weeks.
                  Great carvings. Thank you for sharing. Are barks safe to be left on the carvings?
                  Some said that barks can hide wood worms which will attack the wood through time.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
                    Of real tree size, there are half a dozen different birch species across Canada. Betula papyrifera is by far the most common.
                    I don't even know if there's any other, as far west in the mountains as I live.

                    I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks in seasoned birch. Sure, it's stiff. Dry wood. Teak or Ebony or Mahogany it ain't.
                    Beautiful, aromatic, straight-grained and knot free. Everything you could ask for.
                    I use it for adze handles as well.

                    AdzesB.JPG

                    Great carvings, Brian. Thank you for sharing.
                    Are the handles treated with oil? How are they finished?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      These are the everyday rough-out tools that I use in western red cedar. I have forgotten what might be on the wood.
                      The blades are dry-hafted against raw wood.
                      The rest of it might have got a dab or two of MinWax Tung Oil Protective Finish, as that's all I ever use.
                      Most of the time, as for crooked knife handles, I do nothing at all.

                      Tell you what, I'll take pictures of the build of a new elbow adze, a full Sitka from Kestrel Tool.
                      The blades run me about $100.00 each so I don't have very many.
                      Just got the new Sitka blade and have a pattern laid out, found a birch slab, too.
                      Brian T

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        RV , thanks in advance !!
                        Denny

                        photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Today, I have cut some trunks with saw. I am wondering if it would be better to debark them. There were some thin film like stuff coming off from the barks.
                          I am worried about wood worm hiding in the bark, and later will eat up the wood, or develop some sort of decay?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Depends on where you live, as far as worms/insects. What type of wood?
                            Bill
                            Living among knives and fire.

                            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              We are in Scotland UK, very humid and damp during winter, but very cold too.
                              Wood is the Birch trees I just cut. I have cut them into small pieces but barks are still there.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by kiri View Post

                                Great carvings. Thank you for sharing. Are barks safe to be left on the carvings?
                                Some said that barks can hide wood worms which will attack the wood through time.
                                I have not had any problems with worms and have some pieces that have been around for years. But I have no idea if you would have a problem where you are.
                                Joe

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X