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Carving wood from fresh cut Birch Tree

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  • kiri
    replied
    Yes, we have spotted rodent droppings in the shed, and are so much horrified, that we installed some pest repellent powered by mains.
    Removed the birches from the shed to indoors, they are lying in the spare bathroom now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    The sugar content of birch sap is quite high.
    Very attractive to small rodents and insect larvae ( wood borers).
    From time to time., look at the fresh wood surface.
    It could become moldy very quickly.
    All I ever did was to dry-wipe the moldy surface with a cloth.

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  • kiri
    replied
    I did peel the bark off a trunk of cut birch. It was peeling very well like fruit. It was very watery inside of the trunk.
    I left the peel in the shed. I am afraid that mouse will be attracted to them to chew.

    I didn't know wood warm is geographical problem?

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  • JoeVM
    replied
    Originally posted by kiri View Post

    Great carvings. Thank you for sharing. Are barks safe to be left on the carvings?
    Some said that barks can hide wood worms which will attack the wood through time.
    I have not had any problems with worms and have some pieces that have been around for years. But I have no idea if you would have a problem where you are.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiri
    replied
    We are in Scotland UK, very humid and damp during winter, but very cold too.
    Wood is the Birch trees I just cut. I have cut them into small pieces but barks are still there.

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  • woodburner807
    replied
    Depends on where you live, as far as worms/insects. What type of wood?

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  • kiri
    replied
    Today, I have cut some trunks with saw. I am wondering if it would be better to debark them. There were some thin film like stuff coming off from the barks.
    I am worried about wood worm hiding in the bark, and later will eat up the wood, or develop some sort of decay?

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    RV , thanks in advance !!

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  • Brian T
    replied
    These are the everyday rough-out tools that I use in western red cedar. I have forgotten what might be on the wood.
    The blades are dry-hafted against raw wood.
    The rest of it might have got a dab or two of MinWax Tung Oil Protective Finish, as that's all I ever use.
    Most of the time, as for crooked knife handles, I do nothing at all.

    Tell you what, I'll take pictures of the build of a new elbow adze, a full Sitka from Kestrel Tool.
    The blades run me about $100.00 each so I don't have very many.
    Just got the new Sitka blade and have a pattern laid out, found a birch slab, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • kiri
    replied
    Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
    Of real tree size, there are half a dozen different birch species across Canada. Betula papyrifera is by far the most common.
    I don't even know if there's any other, as far west in the mountains as I live.

    I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks in seasoned birch. Sure, it's stiff. Dry wood. Teak or Ebony or Mahogany it ain't.
    Beautiful, aromatic, straight-grained and knot free. Everything you could ask for.
    I use it for adze handles as well.

    AdzesB.JPG

    Great carvings, Brian. Thank you for sharing.
    Are the handles treated with oil? How are they finished?

    Leave a comment:


  • kiri
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeVM View Post
    Here are some faces carved in green birch. I found it too hard to carve comfortably when dry but not bad while still green. These pieces were cut in the spring and were actually too wet to carve for a couple of weeks.
    Great carvings. Thank you for sharing. Are barks safe to be left on the carvings?
    Some said that barks can hide wood worms which will attack the wood through time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    I'll find the old pictures. I did it before the hack. I'll start a new thread. Technically simple.
    The same trick to wrapping the feet of the guides when you build a fishing rod.

    Looks can be deceptive:
    The upper break from yellow to black on the elbow adze actually marks the Holm Constant for best hand position!
    The yellow is #18 nylon surveyor's cord from a hardwae store. The black is #18 tarred nylon seine cord from a chandler.
    The cord is pulled so tight that you would see the pattern crushed into the surface of the birch.

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    where do i learn how to wrap with cord like that?

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    incredibly beautiful and functional custom work there RV

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Of real tree size, there are half a dozen different birch species across Canada. Betula papyrifera is by far the most common.
    I don't even know if there's any other, as far west in the mountains as I live.

    I carved 70 spoons and 30 forks in seasoned birch. Sure, it's stiff. Dry wood. Teak or Ebony or Mahogany it ain't.
    Beautiful, aromatic, straight-grained and knot free. Everything you could ask for.
    I use it for adze handles as well.

    AdzesB.JPG

    Leave a comment:

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