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    Don't know if this is any good for carving type of wood not sure sold in the UK mainly for hedging maybe part of the leylandii family but slower growing and i think it had gold in the title. What surprised me was the bark when removing the bark hard to describe it looks stringy or flaky i thought bark always came off in a one'r still a bit damp maybe the rain hate to think it will crack when fully dry.
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  • #2
    It’s a cedar or conifer tree. Not my first choice or for that matter a type of wood I have ever considered carving. Brian carves yellow cedar so it can be done. As for carving green (wet) wood and having it crack is just the chance you take when you carve free wood. I often carve Aspen it is common growing widely in northern climates, and not popular as a commercial product. If you really want to carve green wood there are steps you can take to avoid cracking but in the long run I prefer removing the pith letting it dry first.
    Last edited by Nebraska; 08-17-2021, 08:26 AM.
    Ed
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/bmart50/m.h...1&_ipg=&_from=
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    • #3
      Definitely appears to be some kind of cedar or related species. If so, then the chances are very good that it will crack as it dries out unless you take alternate measures. Personally, I've carved cedar wet and dry but have never had any luck with it not cracking regardless of precautions.

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      • #4
        Just spent 10 mins posting a reply don't know where it went will try again tomorrow

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        • #5
          The surface texture and the underlying bast fiber tells me that this is not a conifer at all.
          Looks really dry, anyway. If it is, it certainly has not cracked much at all (which is carving-good.)
          However, it might have shifted from cheese to bone as it dried.

          Looking at the surface, I'll venture to say it's some species of Populus, what we call aspens and poplars.

          Stick a knife in it for practice anyway.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            it reminds me of a tree we have in the front yard called "English Leaf Tree" it sheds its bark once a year in big scales. I carved a cane out of a limb, went well.
            . . .JoeB

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            • #7
              Since yesterday i have been doing a little reading and hope you except my knowledge of trees is only from what i read. The last house i lived in i paneled a room in cedar which was imported i don't think cedar is grown in the UK, conifers i always thought as being huge and would not be used for hedging and there was never any cones produced (cones hence the name)? Now here where it gets complicated for me through reading it is cupressus x leylandii don't know if cupressus refers to conifer when reading about conifers it mentions cedar, firs, pines and so on that's where it becomes complicated. Reason for posting was the bark a light rub with the file it comes off just like hair i always thought bark came of in one piece. Anyway will try to cut or file a flat so i can draw something will see how it goes has been lying about the garden for 3 years, now a silly statement it appears to be a soft wood really hard to cut.

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              • #8
                Here's what the Wood Database says: https://www.wood-database.com/leyland-cypress/ Photos of end grain of the wood and a couple of turned pieces. Hardness is about the same as basswood, so it should be fairly easy to carve.

                Claude
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                • #9
                  Claude
                  That is some info to yourself and all others
                  Many Thanks

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                  • #10
                    Leyland Cypress is a great privacy screen. I've planted some around different parts of my property for privacy. Grows fast.

                    That doesn't look like Leyland Cypress to me though. It looks more like something in the Birch or Alder family, but who knows without seeing it in person.
                    Anders.
                    https://www.etsy.com/shop/BlackBladesNW

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