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  • Basswood Egg expectations?

    I just ordered some basswood eggs for the first time and I want to see if my expectations are too high/incorrect.

    When they arrived I noticed two things:

    -- Some of them have very small flat spots near the top and one has a bit of a flat spot on the one side. Is this normal? For my use I don't think this will matter but I was a little surprised.

    -- All of them have the bottoms flattened so they sit without a base/egg holder. I'm not sure this bothers me but I didn't expect this as it was not mentioned in the description. Is it assumed that wood eggs have flat bottoms unless it specifically says otherwise?

    These were ordered from a reputable vendor, I mostly want to know what the expectations are for these -- I am not trying to attack any vendors.

    Thanks,

    B~

  • #2
    I find the flat bottoms a plus, as far as the other concerns, they should be manageable. I'm sure these might be mass turned/produced, so to expect some defect is to be expected.
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      I'm with Joe.... The flat bottoms seem to come in handy more than the oval ones. As for production faults I'd have to say unless you visit a brick and mortar store and hand pick the eggs yourself that you're going to get some that are imperfect. I've done quite a bit of egg carving and have made multiple orders from multiple sources. The only time that I've never received an imperfect Chicken or Goose egg was when I picked them out myself at the Smoky Mountain Woodcarvers Store in Townsend, Tennessee. That's not to say that the box to select from didn't contain any imperfect eggs, only that I just selected the ones that looked the best. However, the solution to the problem is to work the imperfection into the design of your project.

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      • #4
        I assume you are chip carvjng the basswood eggs. The carved egg could be supported on the thin rod or wire.

        egg1.jpg

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        • #5
          Phil, they are also great for doing relief carving
          You do not have permission to view this gallery.
          This gallery has 2 photos.
          . . .JoeB

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          • #6
            Thanks everyone!

            I wasn't trying to complain I just wanted to get a better understanding of expectations! Seems like these are in line with what is normal.

            B~

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            • #7
              I also would like some guidance. I am wanting to try my hand at carving eggs. Just want to know what is the norm. I understand they are NOT all going to be “perfect” or without blemishes, but want to know the tolerances somewhat. I have seen a large price different from vendor to vendor per egg.

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              • #8
                I'd expect that the higher the price, the better the egg, but these days quality has been pretty bad. I volunteered as a Scout leader for 15+ years and bought various items to make awards out of. I never saw an egg (for instance) that wasn't egg-shaped. I've not been a leader since '05, due to work requirements, so things have obviously changed for the worse.

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