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  • Bradford pear

    Was wondering if anyone had any expericence with this wood. I have some from a tree that fell a couple of years ago, I split one piece and it is really nice.
    Thanks

    Robert

  • #2
    Re: Bradford pear

    Hello Robert,

    Pear is a prized wood for advanced ship modellers! The Pear wood holds detail fantisticlly and developes a wonderful hue / pantia over the years. European modellers use it a lot, for some reason it isn't as frequently used in North America, I have had to import the little bit I have. It carves hard, small slices only, power best, sands to a beautiful finish. Much like the other fruit woods, only Pear is prized above all. Haven't tried the Apple wood that I got last month, have to let it cure for a year or two first. Going to use the whole tree for a model I've planned.

    Now, if you aren't happy with your results, you can package up all the Pear wood you have and I'll take it off your hands! Smile

    Bob
    Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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    • #3
      Re: Bradford pear

      thanks for the info, I plan on doing some ducks with it, it has gotten some really nice "worm holes" in it.

      Robert

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      • #4
        Re: Bradford pear

        And to think, I've been using it in the bbq xxx makes good brisket too. Maybe I'd better rethink my priorities.

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        • #5
          Re: Bradford pear

          I can only speak from my own personal experience as it relates to using bradford pear, which is grown widely by local nurserie's, in using it for carving my walking sticks.

          A couple of years ago the power company had to remove a lot of branford pear limbs that had twisted themselves in the electrical lines here on property where I work. After observing some of the arrow straight limbs I asked and they allowed me to clean them up.

          I allowed the limbs several months for drying out then I began to let the kids in our school woodshop use them for making their walking sticks. Boy oh boy, were those some kind of HARD carving limbs and I mean that with a capital "H"!! A few of the kids actually hung in there and got a decent stick after a lot of laboring on the shaving horse but they sure worked for it!

          Personally, I decided that it wasn't worth it for what I intended which is for walking sticks. I also didn't allow the kids to use our carving knives on the wood because it was like trying to carve a woodspirit in dry hickory or locust... just too darn hard.

          I imagine that it'd be just fine for other purposes if processed into lumber but I'll never volunteer to clean up a mess of bradford pear for carving... but I betcha it'd burn good in the wood heater!!
          Dave Brock

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          • #6
            Re: Bradford pear

            I just started turning a few pens on the lathe, and I bet that pearwood would turn and polish beautifully on a lathe! I have an old apple that needs to come out, its a dwarf, will try to save a chunk for you Bob..........whenever I get up the gumption to take it down LOLMotorcycle
            "Lif iz lik a box "o" choc lets, ya nevr kno whut yull git!"

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            • #7
              Re: Bradford pear

              I'd appreciate that Dave, the wood should turn beautifully too. Apple and Pear, a little Cherry and a touch of Ebony would make a real smart looking model!

              Bob
              Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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              • #8
                Re: Bradford pear

                Watch out Bob! You're drooling again.
                Garon

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                • #9
                  Re: Bradford pear

                  Sorry....can't help it! I seem to go into this trance like state when I'm around certain woods or even talking about them. When I was a nipper, I use to get that way with girls, but now all I can think of is... would they'd look better carved in Walnut or Pear! Oh the shame!!!

                  Bob
                  Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi Bob,
                    I realize this is an old post but we just cut down our Bradford Pear tree. We live in NC in USA if you would like any. We left about a six foot stump as we are looking for an artist to carve a tree spirit.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Toadnomore View Post
                      Hi Bob,
                      I realize this is an old post but we just cut down our Bradford Pear tree. We live in NC in USA if you would like any. We left about a six foot stump as we are looking for an artist to carve a tree spirit.
                      Do not leave the stump in the ground. It will rot. For sure.

                      Cut it off, have it carved, mount it such a way that it does not touch the ground.

                      Lots of people have thought that the rot won't happen to them. It does. Every time.

                      Also, some use the term "just cut down" to mean anything from yesterday, to two years. If your tree has been down for over a year, it may already be too late.

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