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True Red Cedar?

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  • True Red Cedar?

    RV, here are three snaps I took while I was in progress. You can see in the first my weapon of choice in the foreground and the blank laminated from three pieces edge joined and glued up. The second shot shows some of the chipping I was already experiencing and if you look closely you can already see some of the crazy glue repairs. (Dang I hate when that happens.) The last one shows the finished piece except for the edge trimming and all said and done it didn\'t turn out too badly for a first attempt at relief and a first try with cedar. It looked really nice once I got a coat of Tung Oil on it to help it weather.

    Tinwood
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: True Red Cedar?

    You really must have wanted this to finish. Great result.
    Sure does look like western red cedar but we must be keeping the good wood in BC. Look at the front of a good acoustic guitar: see how evenly spaced the growth rings are? Often 10+/inch, even if it\'s a book-matched pair of wood pieces? There are other factors that make up quality tone wood spruce but you get the idea.
    More questions:
    Were you using the straight knife to make the stop cuts then carving back to those with the gouge? That prevents long runout splits.
    Things I can see are very unevenly spaced growth rings = would have been soft spots and boney spots.

    The border, at the bottom, just to the right of the face = I see a length of what I call \"stuttering\" where the top of the ridge has a series of little chippings (crushings?) in a row that match the growth rings.
    Looking at the slope of the end grain, I would have had to carve that from left to right, to sweep across and down into the wood. To the left of the face would have been the other way.The first very shallow cut is either smooth and easy or it stalls.

    Keep it a secret that you had to do some glue fixes. At the very least, you found the bits to stick them back in place. I can\'t find the pop-outs in the mess on my shop floor. I\'ve become a Picasso with the wood putty, particularly if that is to be painted.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      Re: True Red Cedar?

      Looks like a beautiful piece of work to me!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: True Red Cedar?

        Hi Tinwood, I agree with Eddy, It is a Beautiful piece of Work. Merle

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: True Red Cedar?

          Very nice!

          Claude
          My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

          My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

          My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: True Red Cedar?

            Thanks guys, and RV, I did a lot of the work with that crazy bench knife cause I\'m a gluten for punishment. I did most of the rounding over etc. with the knife then where I couldn\'t get the valleys I used the gouge but only sparingly. I would try to lay the knife almost on it\'s side to carve back to the stop cuts and get my depth that way. Mostly the outer edge was done with the gouge because it wasn\'t possible to flex that blade enough. I try to be a purist as far as the carving work goes and use mostly the knife. Stubborn I guess. I do have another gouge about the same size as the number five in the photo, it\'s a number nine and I do have a Warren bent gouge and vee tool along with a couple of micro gouges and vee tools but I plug away with that old knife. That wood was just a bear to try and run that knife through, it felt like I was trying to carve a wash board when I was doing the stop cuts across the grain. I told my cousin I would do it for her and I persevered but boy did I ever invent some new expletive deleteds in the process!!

            Tinwood

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            • #7
              Re: True Red Cedar?

              Tinwood, you\'ve emerged from this with a gold star. The carving result is something to be genuinely proud of. At the same time, you have learned a huge amount about the headaches in carving western red cedar. Never. Ever. Fall in love with the piece.
              You\'ll be fine.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                Re: True Red Cedar?

                Not only as RV say did you learn something about the wood, but you broaden your knife skill. I am sure your cousin will be most delighted with Your efforts, but if she isn\'t I am sure you would not have any problems finding another home for your carving, I would mind it at all
                . . .JoeB
                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  Re: True Red Cedar?

                  WOW!
                  What a great looking piece of work!
                  You sure have a lot of stick -to- it-iveness.
                  After reading your post, I admit that I probably would have given up!
                  You always hear that it is just a piece of wood, but you proved that it can become so much more!

                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Re: True Red Cedar?

                    Tinwood, your project is an amazing piece of art, who ever this project
                    is meant to keep it will always treasure it. Thanks for sharing.
                    Oscar

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                    • #11
                      Re: True Red Cedar?

                      Your outstanding relief carving demonstrates that good results can be achieved in spite of challenging wood qualities. Even after years of carving experience we have to rethink our tool choices, techniques, & sharpening approaches as we start each new project. I recently repeated (with variations) a relief I had carved 40+ years ago. What a challenge!

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                      • #12
                        Re: True Red Cedar?

                        Thank you all for the kind words. I had made this to hang on my cousin\'s new garden shed and that was why I made it from cedar. If I had known she was going to tell me it was too nice to hang outside and put on her family room wall, I might have done the darn thing in something a little more friendly to carve with. I was pretty pleased that she liked it that much though it sure was a \"learning\" experience. Ha.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: True Red Cedar?

                          Very nice carving.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: True Red Cedar?

                            Thank you sir.

                            Tinwood

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                            • #15
                              Re: True Red Cedar?

                              Yellow Cedar is a much better carving wood and more durable than Red cedar too.

                              I have carved in Western Red Cedar, and hope never to do it again!

                              I have also done lots of work in Yellow Cedar. Absolutely night and day difference! Actually am planning a big project in the near future that may wind up being done in Yellow Cedar.

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