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Blowtorch recommendation?

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  • Blowtorch recommendation?

    Hello, I'm a beginner, just doing my first acorn. I gather that a blowtorch is often a tool used to add colour etc, can anyone recommend me the right one to buy please (UK). Many thanks!
    Last edited by JohanJ; 05-16-2019, 03:09 AM.

  • #2
    Welcome to WCI forums.

    I use a Bernzomatic propane bottle torch. Mostly to burn off excess fuzzies from chainsaw carvings that I buy.
    It is so hot that I use a wire brush to scrub off most of the black charcoal. I see that I do not get any "acorn brown" coloring.

    If I wanted brown, I would seriously consider a stain, applied as a spray (airbrush, that sort of thing.)
    Brian T

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    • #3
      I don't do it myself but when I go to chain carving events I see the carvers just using a regular handheld torch as Brian described above. I do know you can buy different types of "nozzles" such as spreaders, etc. but didn't notice anything special being used at the festivals. Just carve away and see what you need.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, really appreciate the help. I did use a stain and that worked to some degree, though I' also wanted some darker strokes on there to differentiate the crust from the nut. It's a great process of discovery being new at something and the discoveries I made yesterday is a) I can use my dremel as well and b) my dremel has a ton of blades I can play with and c) by controlling the speed of the dremel you can create and even remove dark burn bits... result! I've also bought a blowtorch thing with variable setting so I get to play with that when it arrives today. Good fun this

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        • #5
          The only thing I have to add is that I'd recommend using a standard propane cylinder on that Bernzomatic Torch and not Mapp gas. Mapp gas burns hotter and might provide more heat than you desire.

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