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  • Silver Maple Tree Stump

    I'm having an old silver maple in my backyard removed soon and was thinking of having them leave some of the trunk carve. Has anyone carved silver silver maple before? Would it be better to carve it green or let it sit for a while? Or should I just have the whole thing removed?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    My opinion is that Silver Maple is too hard for most carvers, even in its green state. Also, the wavy, burl, or bird's eye grain is often near the base of the trunk. It would more logically be of interest to wood turners.

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    • #3
      aeolate, If it were me, and I am a bunch different than the crowd, I would take some and just try and see what I could do with it. I am into hardwoods, and stone.
      AND ,,OH YEAH! well it wood be a challenge..Am going to do a Black walnut candle holder ( hopefully) in the next 3-4 weeks, and pallin I did one in Sycamore a couple years ago, darn near wore my tools out, and me. I love a challenge. And have some old Maples around here that I steal a few branches to make small things. That Silver sounds like a good start for a NEW tool box.. And chisels ..
      aeolate Good luck in your ventures
      Chuck in Oregon.
      Chuck
      Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

      https://mewe.com/profile/5d6f213642db757a5dfb3223

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      • #4
        Silver Maple is a hard wood to carve it can be hard on tools. If you choose to give it a try keep your cut shollow, working your way down in the wood. I would recommend using it for bases for your carvings.

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        • #5
          Chuck - Yes, I have carved Black Walnut and Sycamore - even Manzanita (not Madrone), but most carvers would not bother to try Silver Maple, partly due to hardness, but also the wild grain patterns.

          plateS1.jpgclimberW1.jpg
          Sycamore, Black Walnut

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pallin View Post
            Chuck - Yes, I have carved Black Walnut and Sycamore - even Manzanita (not Madrone), but most carvers would not bother to try Silver Maple, partly due to hardness, but also the wild grain patterns.

            plateS1.jpgclimberW1.jpg
            Sycamore, Black Walnut
            pallin, that is a great job on both!! Wish I could find a piece of Syc that big.. Have a Cherry knot about 9" square a landscaper tree guy gave me.. Am waithing to bust up some tools on on it. And Brian ,, I need a bigger table saw. Or a nasty sabre saw.. And of course chain gloves..
            Chuck
            Chuck
            Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

            https://mewe.com/profile/5d6f213642db757a5dfb3223

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            • #7
              I do not like maple as an outdoor stump carving wood. In general, don't like it durability properties so I turn down maple onsite jobs. With that being said, since it's your tree and your time and money invested it could turn out to be a fun carve. I would not get into big detail, keep more on the simple side of design. I personally would carve it while its on the green side. It should be easier to carve while green. Just my thoughts on the matter.
              Carve safe,
              Bob

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              • #8
                ​​Thank you all for the inputs. I managed to carve a little spirit into one of the branches fairly easily. It gummed up my Kutzall pretty good but seems to carve fairly easily. I imagine I wouldn't have been able to do it once it was dried though, even being the softer of the maples it's still pretty hard. For the main trunk I was actually thinking of using it to try a chainsaw carving, or an angle grinder. Nothing detailed, something like a totem pole or stylized piece. Of course that was before I found out how much it will cost me to cut down. I'm considering saving another year but I don't want it to grow anymore. The thing is already huge and causing too much damage. One of the hidden costs of home ownership I guess.

                StickSpirit.jpg
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  If you know anyone building guitars they might like a chunk of that to put away to season for a few years. I just scored a huge chunk of flowering cherry that is pretty good tone wood and can't wait for the 3 years to pass so I can start working on it.

                  Nicely figured seasoned wood is worth quite a lot of cash as luthiers like it for guitar necks and bodies. Just a thought.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aeolate View Post
                    ​​Thank you all for the inputs. I managed to carve a little spirit into one of the branches fairly easily. It gummed up my Kutzall pretty good but seems to carve fairly easily. I imagine I wouldn't have been able to do it once it was dried though, even being the softer of the maples it's still pretty hard. For the main trunk I was actually thinking of using it to try a chainsaw carving, or an angle grinder. Nothing detailed, something like a totem pole or stylized piece. Of course that was before I found out how much it will cost me to cut down. I'm considering saving another year but I don't want it to grow anymore. The thing is already huge and causing too much damage. One of the hidden costs of home ownership I guess.

                    StickSpirit.jpg
                    aeolate, how has that tree come out, I have been of and on for a while I liked your relief on the branch, great job there. Also noted you comment about owning a home. I live a HOA Homeowners Assoc. and our county has just sent out a notice that all the homeowners on our street have to replace ALL the street trees. HA at our expense. The trees all a Maple and classified as a nuisance? BY whom I do not know 40 homes = over 60 trees over 45 years old. .. Much fun. By the way how did you clean that Kutzall?
                    Chuck
                    Chuck
                    Always hoping for a nice slice that won't need sanding!

                    https://mewe.com/profile/5d6f213642db757a5dfb3223

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I recently carved a wind-felled silver maple. I would guess it was down for around a year. The wood that was still green carved very smoothly and easily most of the time, but occasionally the grain would do something different and I'd have a difficult time with it. I finished the spoon I was working and it looked beautiful. After oiling it though, I could see a blue-gray staining that I assume was caused by remaining wet and on the forest floor for so long. I tried cutting some of the wood that had dried completely and it was too hard for the amount of time I was willing to invest.

                      Perhaps take the tree down a branch at a time and carve the branches green. One aspect that I did not like for spoons, was getting curves to cut smoothly. I appreciated carving a new species though. Good luck!

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                      • #12
                        the first few seconds of reading your first post, i assumed you meant leaving some stump for a chainsaw carving. chainsaw along with angle grinder is a good combination.. if it doesnt turn out well, it can be easily converted to campfirewood.
                        a stump like that sure does look like it would be perfect for the upper half of a bearcub climbing out of a hollow stump.
                        Denny

                        photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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