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Bar oil options?

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I'm glad that I found that little carving series of 3 videos.
    I don't care too much about the chainsaw work, as skilled as he is.
    What interests me in any and all of this kind of video is to study the hand tool use.
    Sizes, shapes, sweeps, and carving actions.
    I sit and watch people like Bill Henderson over and over.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7JFccGtPH8

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric B
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    My Poulan power saw with a 16" bar is pretty much a toy.
    Common saws here have 24" - 36" bars. As you can see from my avatar, there is some serious firewood to cut. That was a ratty log with rot & pitch pockets, etc.
    I like the Remington electric because it's fairly quiet and instant on.

    I have never seen the chain oil make a mess of a log. If anything, the bar is sort of
    self-cleaning and the oil comes off in the sawdust.

    This is a series. Tom is quick to use a power saw on a log.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmamiSi4meQ

    I'm not doing enough big carvings to really justify dressing up for a power saw.
    A bow saw and chisels makes quick work of shaping western red cedar.
    The rest of it, I can manage with a draw knife and a couple of elbow adzes.
    I've never been able to think fast enough to get ahead of power carving.
    Hi Brian

    The video of Tom you posted i watched this series a lot of times and will do again and again he is one of my favorite carvers and a real inspiration.

    Maybe my saws are not set right but after im done carving with the chain saw the piece is oily to the touch and it feels way better to handle oil you could eat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric B
    replied
    I have switched to using canola oil and it actually feeds better so in summer it might feed to fast and reducing oil feed might be necessary.

    Only thing below -15 -20 it hardens up but who carves in those temps anyways aha.

    Thank you guys!

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    My Poulan power saw with a 16" bar is pretty much a toy.
    Common saws here have 24" - 36" bars. As you can see from my avatar, there is some serious firewood to cut. That was a ratty log with rot & pitch pockets, etc.
    I like the Remington electric because it's fairly quiet and instant on.

    I have never seen the chain oil make a mess of a log. If anything, the bar is sort of
    self-cleaning and the oil comes off in the sawdust.

    This is a series. Tom is quick to use a power saw on a log.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmamiSi4meQ

    I'm not doing enough big carvings to really justify dressing up for a power saw.
    A bow saw and chisels makes quick work of shaping western red cedar.
    The rest of it, I can manage with a draw knife and a couple of elbow adzes.
    I've never been able to think fast enough to get ahead of power carving.

    Leave a comment:


  • NoDNA
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    Both of my power saws were gifts. Poulan gasser and a Remington electric, 16" bars.
    Not to be used indoors, the cedar dust goes every where even if the oil does not.
    I'd like to know if there are any biodegradable bar oils made for industrial saw work.
    BrianT Just a thought. I know from my mechanical experiences that water is a great lubricant. It may flow a lot faster but your bars won't burn up and the wood you are working on won't have that oil all over it..? In all the large mills they use water for those big blades. And you don't have to worry about the engine burning up, but may relay caution with the electric one?
    Chuck

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    Both of my power saws were gifts. Poulan gasser and a Remington electric, 16" bars.
    Not to be used indoors, the cedar dust goes every where even if the oil does not.
    I'd like to know if there are any biodegradable bar oils made for industrial saw work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric B
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    Locals here use Mazola corn oil for a dedicated saw to quarter moose/elk/deer.
    One guy I know takes a cordless SawzAll for quartering game.
    He says plenty of charge to do it all.

    Realistically, aside from the toxicity of conventional bar oil, how messy and sloppy will you be out in the forest?
    Hello Brian for me bar oil and the mess it makes everywhere is just nasty always disliked it leaving all that oil in the forest,in the air and on my clothes,skin,lungs etc. The fact its 2 stroke is more than enough and the nasty noise but for a tool to cut and shape wood its unbeatable so far.
    Now i have dedicated carving space and not be able to leave my mess to other creatures i have to deal with it and a toxic work space i do not want so i will definitely use canola/vegetable oil from now on.
    Also electric chain saw on the menu.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric B
    replied
    Originally posted by Woodcarver222 View Post
    I use Canola oil in mine. Much better for me and the environment. Do some research on google, plenty of information. Be safe
    Hi Woodcarver thank you for the tip!

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian T
    replied
    Locals here use Mazola corn oil for a dedicated saw to quarter moose/elk/deer.
    One guy I know takes a cordless SawzAll for quartering game.
    He says plenty of charge to do it all.

    Realistically, aside from the toxicity of conventional bar oil, how messy and sloppy will you be out in the forest?

    Leave a comment:


  • Woodcarver222
    replied
    I use Canola oil in mine. Much better for me and the environment. Do some research on google, plenty of information. Be safe

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric B
    started a topic Bar oil options?

    Bar oil options?

    While store bought chainsaw bar oils work great i wonder if cooking oils would be better for environment and which ones work?

    Eric
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