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  • Doug Outside Figures Continue!

    I've done two more 'Doug Outside' figures (SEE BELOW) and I'm more or less pleased. But their arms look a little rigid and their button holes are askew.

    I've done hands in pockets before, but I'm not entirely pleased with that either. I think I will carve my next 'Doug Outside' figure with arms at side, but bend them a little, so the hands come a bit to the front.

    As for the buttons, I'll try placing them in the middle of the shirt and eliminate the veritical cut that separates the shirt.

    We'll see how this all works out. It's nice to have a new project. I call it 'seeking perfection'.

    I'd be interested in any ideas to achieve what I'd like to achieve. I'd also be interested in hearing some interesting ideas, observations or thoughts about flat plane corving in general.
    Last edited by Rodster; 08-09-2018, 05:40 PM.
    Rodster
    https://rodster.ca

  • #2
    Heck, my buttons never rub straight down the front of my shirt, seems to kind of bulge out and to the side, darn tailors
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      I am a fan
      Herb

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      • #4
        Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
        Heck, my buttons never rub straight down the front of my shirt, seems to kind of bulge out and to the side, darn tailors
        Your joke is amusing. The Brits would say 'droll'.
        How 'bout more funny one-liners? If you're now 'on a roll.'
        Last edited by Rodster; 08-11-2018, 08:35 AM.
        Rodster
        https://rodster.ca

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        • #5
          Looking good Rodster!

          Tinwood

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          • #6
            Rod, I usually have my caricature's hands all the way into the pockets so that no skin shows. Then it's just a matter of thinning out the bottom sleeve to make the hands look like they're inside the pants. That also allows for a greater bend in the arms so that they look more natural. I'm not suggesting that my way of doing it is right or not, just my way!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Eddy-Smiles View Post
              Rod, I usually have my caricature's hands all the way into the pockets so that no skin shows . . .
              Thanks for your comment. I wondered if hands hanging down could be varied a bit, to make them seem a little more natural and attractive. A slight bend at the elbow and then the hand showing at the waist. Only one way to know. I'll give it a try and see.


              Last edited by Rodster; 08-11-2018, 08:31 AM.
              Rodster
              https://rodster.ca

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              • #8
                Rodster;.. Eddy is right, it's easier if you put the entire hand in his pocket,... just use a small V cut above the pocket to simulate a cuff on the shirt ( and another button to carve )
                I find that if you carve the fellows shirt so that it looks like it's tucked in his trousers, then you will have more wood to work with when doing the hands in the pocket look. Also a slight bend at the elbow will bring the hand forward to help achieve the look that you are after.
                Wayne
                Attached Files
                If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Soggy View Post
                  Rodster . . . Eddy is right, it's easier if you put the entire hand in his pocket . . . Wayne

                  Thanks for the advice. What a smart, young man you've carved? He's just great. Nice pocket too!
                  Last edited by Rodster; 08-10-2018, 07:42 PM.
                  Rodster
                  https://rodster.ca

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                  • #10
                    IMG_0062.JPG
                    To correct the buttons that looked askew on my earlier 'Doug Outside' carvings (see above), I have carved a new figure, notched the button holes and placed a dot of black paint for the buttons. I didn't bother with a slice down the front to mark the edge of the shirt. Don't forget to click on the picture for a larger image.

                    I think the new version works quite well and looks better for the change. The arms also look a little better, but they need more work. That's okay! There's always tomorrow.
                    Last edited by Rodster; 08-19-2018, 09:26 PM.
                    Rodster
                    https://rodster.ca

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                    • #11
                      Looks good to me Rodster, With most of us here be caricature carvers, he is right at home
                      . . .JoeB

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by joepaulbutler View Post
                        Looks good to me Rodster, With most of us here being caricature carvers, he is right at home


                        What is the difference between flat plane and caricature carving? The caricature carvers at my club tend to use a band saw to give them a head start on carving a figure, carve larger figures using patterns, use a dremel and sandpaper to form their carvings and see cuts and angles as a problem requiring rectification.

                        Of course, flat planers use band saws and a few of the above techniques as well. So it is a little unclear what the distinction is. I call my little guys flat plane because I learned from Gene Messer. But I also learned from Jack Price and I don't think he considered himself a flat planer.

                        I think we're all one happy family with many individual styles. If it were up to me, I'd merge the two categories. But I don't feel strongly about it; it's easy enough to visit both.
                        Last edited by Rodster; 08-19-2018, 10:30 PM.
                        Rodster
                        https://rodster.ca

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                        • #13
                          The Scandinavian flat-plane style of woodcarving is a style of figure carving. The figures are carved in large flat planes, created primarily using a carving knife. Tool marks are left in the carving and very little (if any) rounding or sanding is done.Emil Janel, a Swedish-born American artist, was considered by many to be one of the best of this genre.

                          This is " one " definition of flat plane carving as provided by wikipedia.
                          Wayne
                          If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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                          • #14
                            Rod, You have the buttons in the right place, and I think you still should do the line for the shirt overlap, just to the left of the buttons. Look at your shirt. Mens overlap from the left, and women's from the right. Have your wife take a picture of the side of you showing your hand in your pocket, and you can see about how much bend you need at the elbow.. You are coming along great.
                            If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

                            www.spokanecarvers.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tom Ellis View Post
                              Rod, You have the buttons in the right place, and I think you still should do the line for the shirt overlap, just to the left of the buttons. Look at your shirt. Mens overlap from the left, and women's from the right. Have your wife take a picture of the side of you showing your hand in your pocket, and you can see about how much bend you need at the elbow.. You are coming along great.
                              Thanks Tom. Good advice. I have two points to make:


                              1) I agree with your comment about the line overlap. But the lines I cut are thicker than the line that shows up on my own shirt. My thicker carved line throws things out of sync (see first carvings above). I'll try to cut a thinner line, but if you have an example (cut with your own knife on a carving) or some advice, please send it along.
                              2) I have in my mind's eye what I need to do with the arms (pretty much along what you suggest), but the muscle memory required to do so isn't keeping pace with the image in my mind. I've found in the past if I keep at it, my muscle memory learns what it needs to do and starts to work its magic.

                              I'm not interested in hands in pocket. I want to do a normal hand hanging down that doesn't look stiff (at attention) or awkward. It needs a slight bend and the hand should show up a little bit at the front of the figure. If anyone has done this (with both hands), I'd love to see an example (or hear some good advice).
                              Last edited by Rodster; 08-20-2018, 01:28 PM.
                              Rodster
                              https://rodster.ca

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