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Harley Refsal Carvings

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  • Harley Refsal Carvings

    Normally I carve little figures from a block of wood 1.25" square. Currently my characters are 4" in height. When I was learning to carve, I bought a couple of Harley Refsal cutouts and carved Karl Oscar and Kristian. I think they turned out okay. Have a look for yourself.

    While I know I am in the minority, I hold that carving from a block of wood is a good option. Give up on patterns, use a block of wood and you may find that you get a more original Karl Oscar and Kristian. Or something you might like even better.




    Karl Oscar.JPGKristian.JPG
    Last edited by Rodster; 11-01-2018, 01:30 PM.
    Rodster
    https://rodster.ca

  • #2
    I'm decluttering the basement. I'm getting rid of my woodworking stuff as well: clamps, saws, planes and the like ... I hope to clean things up a lot. Passing it along to a younger generation, who have the time and interest, but little money to buy tools, is my recycling choice.

    I've kept the workbench (15" x 60" with two vises), two small hand planes, two small hammers and three small hand saws, a miter saw and a few other useful tools for home maintenance, small projects and woodcarving. In short, I'm left with a workable, but more limited workshop.




    Workbench in alcove.jpg‚Äč
    Last edited by Rodster; 11-01-2018, 01:32 PM.
    Rodster
    https://rodster.ca

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    • #3
      You can actually see the floor! How weird is that? I think you need a second bench.
      What kind of a chair do you like the best?
      Brian T

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Robson Valley View Post
        You can actually see the floor! How weird is that? I think you need a second bench. What kind of a chair do you like the best?


        The above workbench picture was taken when I built the 'workshop alcove'. The paint was fresh and everything looked neat. Today the floor is still clean, but the workbench is messier. I don't have a chair, as the workbench is for stand-up work only. As you can see below, when I carve, I travel light.

        The toolbox and carving board were new when I took the photo. Today I carve with two # 9 Drake gouges, a 1/8" Drake v-tool, 1/4" Drake v-tool, a Helvie detail knife and a D Lyon rough out knife. It's all I really need, other than a miter saw to cut my wood to the proper length.


        Small Tool Tote & Wood Carving Board.jpgimage_14247.jpg
        Last edited by Rodster; 10-31-2018, 08:43 PM.
        Rodster
        https://rodster.ca

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        • #5
          Very fine-looking tools, indeed!
          I see a handsaw miter box on your bench. Do you need a special saw for that?
          I need a big unit for slabbing soapstone for carvings.

          Things changed when I moved away from the city and have a big shop which seems to lend itself to big messes.
          Big gouges and adzes throw chips all over the room. I have to sit most of the time. I have a tall drafting chair on wheels.
          So I have to keep enough floor space swept for "rolling room."

          I'm prepared to believe that Heidi-cat finds the chip piles to be the wrong texture.
          Brian T

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          • #6
            Rod, You can carve from a block. Draw your pattern on, and carve away the extra wood. By cutting out the pattern with a saw, it saves you a lot of carving off wood that a saw could do in seconds. May save some carple tunnel in the future also.
            If I took the time to fix all my mistakes, I wouldn,t have time to make new ones.

            www.spokanecarvers.com

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            • #7
              Thanks for the info on the miter box saw.
              None of the models is big enough for stones and salt blocks for carving.
              I don't need precision, either.
              But they will give me ideas for something to bash together from 2x4 and scrap plywood.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                Nice carvings, tools and carving bench
                Herb

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                • #9
                  Hi Rod
                  I have been making a lot of my caricatures on triangular basswood blanks,it enables me to carve two items from one square block,lets me to sell a for the same price with double of the revenue, If customers prefer to have a a full block carving they pay more. This works for me .
                  Bruce

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                  • #10
                    Good job Rod, I like these little guys they look so cool.
                    ~ Dwight
                    "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by scotia carver View Post
                      Hi Rod
                      I have been making a lot of my caricatures on triangular basswood blanks,it enables me to carve two items from one square block,lets me to sell a for the same price with double of the revenue, If customers prefer to have a a full block carving they pay more. This works for me .
                      Bruce
                      How do you cut a block into a triangle, Bruce? I assume you use a band saw. I wonder if it's dangerous for your fingers? Or can you buy wood cut that way? On your carving philosophy, I like the way your mind works!
                      Last edited by Rodster; 11-04-2018, 09:34 AM.
                      Rodster
                      https://rodster.ca

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                      • #12
                        Before I got my band saw I used a regular hand saw to cut basswood blocks at a 45 for carving Santa faces. I put the block in the bench vise and cut down the first half of the block at the 45. Then put a small wedge in the cut then turned the block over in the vise and cut the other half.
                        Randy

                        WE LIVE IN THE LAND OF THE FREE BECAUSE OF THE BRAVE!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Randy View Post
                          Before I got my band saw I used a regular hand saw to cut basswood blocks at a 45 for carving Santa faces. I put the block in the bench vise and cut down the first half of the block at the 45. Then put a small wedge in the cut then turned the block over in the vise and cut the other half.
                          Good approach. I could do that with my scaled down workshop. Thanks, Randy.
                          Rodster
                          https://rodster.ca

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                          • #14
                            Guess I'm the adventurous type. I have a Delta 3-wheel bandsaw, and I stand the block on the diagonal, using the slot in the table as a guide. I've seen arrangements where the block is put on a "sled" and done that way, but guess I'm used to doing it my way. Still have all my digits!
                            Steve
                            Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!

                            My fb page: https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...8.100000156660 683&type=3

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