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  • Two Types of Carvers

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    Today I attended a carving show, where my seating companion told me there were two types of carvers at the show. One fusses with detail, enjoys carving pieces that do well in competitions and largely carves to please other carvers.

    My friend said he is the other kind. He favors a straight-forward approach, carves smaller figures and eschews untoward detail. He likes to appeal to the buying public. He told me, "among my family and people who buy my carvings, I'm considered a great carver. At the club, not so much."

    Who is right? Well, I'm biased. I like my friend's carvings. Their simplicity and style is first rate. He doesn't fuss to get an eyebrow perfect, or an eyeball just right. He just paints them in. His father told him, "try and earn enough from your hobby to cover your expenses." I think he does so, and then some.

    On the other hand, I am in awe of some of the work our more talented carvers manage to do. So I'll leave you to figure it out.

    I also carve simple figures, so I thought I let you have a look at my latest.




    Last edited by Rodster; 03-10-2019, 08:20 PM.
    Rodster
    https://rodster.ca

  • #2
    Well, my opinion Rodster is you should carve to please yourself, and do it for enjoyment. I do oil painting to make myself happy in the process and with the final result...same with wood carving. I doubt I could win any show in either category. I don't care either.

    Like the little fellow and nice example of flat plane caricature carving...
    Bill
    Living among knives and fire.

    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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    • #3
      I agree with Bill, please yourself. Rodster, I think it's telling that your seating companion's two types of carvers both are concerned with other's opinions, rather than his own satisfaction.

      I think most of us fall somewhere between his two extremes...we carve for our own pleasure, but we listen to our fellow carvers when they critique our work with constructive comments.
      Arthur

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      • #4
        Hi Rod
        I am with you on this subject, I try to carve things that my customers keep coming back to purchase for themselves and as gifts for others, any carving that takes a lot fine detail is not my style, I prefer to keep them simple and pleasing to me and my customers
        I do not like to make competitive carvings,but enjoy going to a show to admire other peoples carvings on display
        Bruce



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        • #5
          I agree with Arthur C and carve for my own pleasure trying to improve as I go along. By the way I do like the carving pictured
          Herb

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          • #6
            I like to carve different things, as it's often a new challenge to try something I haven't done before. If it turns out good, I usually put it in my etsy shop. If it doesn't, it goes to the back of the workbench for comparison with the next time I try the same thing - hopefully learning from my mistakes the first time. Like Rod's friend, I make enough with my sales to cover my expenses and a bit more, enough I have to pay taxes on my sales...
            My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

            My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

            My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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            • #7
              Probably are several different kinds of carvers. One carves for the money and/or the reputation. The other carves to see things in the wood and from the wood.
              Another does carvings that "might" sell. Otherwise, gifting them to undeserving relatives. Always seem to fall back to do stuff for myself.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                Please yourself, you usually are your own worst critic. We all have different personalities so different reasons to carve. I find detail adds to a carving, so I try to achieve as much as I can.

                Bob
                Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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                • #9
                  I say carve what you like to carve. Carve what makes you happy.
                  Keep On Carvin'
                  Bob K.

                  My Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/rwkwoodcarving


                  My Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/robert.kozakiewicz.9


                  My RWK Woodcarving Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwkwood


                  My Pinterest page: https://www.pinterest.com/rwkoz51/

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                  • #10
                    I see a consensus on the motive for carving.
                    None of us do it, because we are starving.

                    For if we were hungry, we'd find better employment.
                    It seems that we whittle for our own enjoyment.

                    There are a few who like to sell all they whittle.
                    The rewards are modest; you'll earn very little.

                    And then there are those who hope for a prize.
                    But if they don't get one, nobody cries.

                    Perhaps there's a motive no one has raised.
                    The company of your fellows on your carving days.
                    Last edited by Rodster; 03-11-2019, 12:30 PM.
                    Rodster
                    https://rodster.ca

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                    • #11
                      Well said, Rodster! I suspected a rhyme was in the offing.

                      Another thought for our motivation: According to the Bible, we are made in the image and likeness of God, and as such, I offer, we have an innate urge to create, a manifestation of the spark of the Divine that we carry.
                      Arthur

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                      • #12
                        It's like everything else. It is what you think of it and if you like what you see. Some are so good, they can look manufactured or they can look like hand made.

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                        • #13
                          I am a simple whittler, I whittle what makes me happy and manage to collect few fans/admirers along the way. I like to whittle the same thing multiple times, so I consider myself lucky that some people relieve me of the 'extras'

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rodster View Post
                            I see a consensus on the motive for carving.
                            None of us do it, because we are starving.

                            For if we were hungry, we'd find better employment.
                            It seems that we whittle for our own enjoyment.

                            There are a few who like to sell all they whittle.
                            The rewards are modest; you'll earn very little.

                            And then there are those who hope for a prize.
                            But if they don't get one, nobody cries.

                            Perhaps there's a motive no one has raised.
                            The company of your fellows on your carving days.
                            I'll have to put my vote on the last one! I have no interest in submitting anything I make to a show and I have absolutely no interest in selling anything that I carve. My wife and I were sitting on the couch just this morning looking at the prolifera of carvings on the bookcase. I'm right proud of some and figure that my carving skills have improved a tad over the years but I only carve "Brain Farts" and then only if they make me happy. Most of what I carve has no destination as it's being carved. It usually ends up on the bookcase unless someone comes along and wants one like it, which if that's the case they generally get the original. I both enjoy sittiing down and carving with someone and I'm also as happy as a clam just to go out and sit on my front bench and carve alone.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Buffalo Bif for your comments. You express my thoughts perfectly, although I like it when someone pays $10 to take a carving off my hands.

                              And Eddy-Smiles (in my book) always gets the last word. He nailed it. Carving is a wonderful hobby and we are the richer for it.


                              For all others who 'chipped in' with comments, thank you. Much appreciated.
                              Last edited by Rodster; 03-14-2019, 01:36 PM.
                              Rodster
                              https://rodster.ca

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