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  • #16
    Wow, those hands look awkward even though they are as per the drawing! I'm going to have to think about how to fix that before I go any further. I should have noted they were carved with a Mora 122, I did cheat and use folded sandpaper to clean out the deeper cuts and I ordered a 1 1/4" OOC knife to help with those tight areas in the future.

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    • #17
      Make it look the way You want it to be, Squid, not an exact copy...just my opinion. I made the mistake when I started out to keep working on a carving and basically destroyed it. I had to learn when to stop reworking it. Again, JMO.
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #18
        woodburner807, I could not find a way to make the Joseph figure look acceptable so I started a new one, about half finished. I merely removed some of the bulk from the Mary figure and it looks decent. I'll square up the old Joseph block and use that block for some other critter. I learned I have to pay more attention to the finished images in these books and use the book just as a suggested process.

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        • #19
          " I learned I have to pay more attention to the finished images in these books and use the book just as a suggested process."

          You hit the nail on the head. It all depends on how you learn best. I like youtube videos and find them easier to digest information from. However, I do use books/magazines sometimes.

          It appears you are evolving your approaches nicely, and just keep it up!


          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #20
            Flat plane carving is a minimalist style of carving. As someone else has described it in a nutshell: you are trying to convey more by doing less. This requires some discipline as there is a tendency to over-detail and round over. Any piece of art requires some level of interpretative engagement from the viewer. The flat broad strokes of the knife and gouge convey the surface facets like on a gem. Even though somewhat simplistic the results can be impressive. There are variations of how this style is accomplished by Refsal, Gunnarsson, the French Canadians, Larsson, Nilsson, Emil Janel, and even in the same family such as the Trygg brothers and their father. Each one is recognizable and distinct to the carver but still falls within this category. The origin of this style is elaborated in Harley Refsal's book that is a must read for anyone interested in this style. Google search images for the above and your eye will answer your question.

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            • #21
              Tony, the original question was "Is there a limit to the amount of rounding before it's no longer considered Flat Plane?" Now perhaps I'm searching for a standard that does not exist but I suspect that is not the case. Surely if I enter a carving in a competition and called it Flat Plane there will be criteria against which it would be judged. The criteria might be written, drawn or photographic but there must be criteria out there somewhere in some form.

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              • #22
                In memory of Lynn Diel.

                See number 7 reply by Lynn: https://forum.woodcarvingillustrated...ivity-question
                http://www.tristatecarvers.com

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                • #23
                  mpounders, thanks for the reply. I don't like subjective judging so I won't be enetering any shows or contests, even as an novice carver.

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                  • #24
                    Neil A. Ward, I didn't get the reference until I went back and looked at a 2009 thread where the same issue was discussed. Had I done a search first I wouldn't have wasted time with my question since there was no satisfactory answer then and nothing seems to have changed. I can accept that and won't be pursuing any more questions about style.

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                    • #25
                      With composing my post I was aware of your original question. If some quantifying limiting criteria are out there that differentiates a transition from flat plane carving to carving in the round, I am not aware of their existence after carving in this style for 29 years. The group of people posting at this site which is infrequent for me and the group viewing this board are more interested in this type of carving than average. With that said this post has been viewed 191 times thus far and it does not appear that what you are searching has yet to be posted. Carve how you like it.

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