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What does flat plane carving mean to you

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  • What does flat plane carving mean to you

    Kind of just what the title says. What do you consider flat plane? Is it the subject matter or how it's carved. For me, FP can be any subject but it needs flat planes. Doesn't need to be large flats like Refsal carves. Can be small planes. That's just me.


  • #2
    Man, you're looking to open a can of worms LOL
    I think it all starts with the Dala, or Dalecarlian horse. Men in a lumber camp, carving something simple and familiar like a horse with a simple knife, over a cup of coffee and a couple bad jokes.
    Pretty soon imagination takes hold- the knives get sharper, the carving gets better, the jokes get worse and God knows what is getting put in the coffee. Just my view.
    Jim

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    • #3
      As much as I like it, something that I can't do. Very bold likenesses.
      I like the way the planes approximate curved surfaces.
      I like the way that human features are still preserved in good position.
      Brian T

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      • #4
        FP carving is another special carving talent
        . . .JoeB

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        • #5
          Well, I love and do flat plane carving and have a great appreciation for it, since I have Norwegian genes. Harley has a fine description in his book about the evolution of that style of carving.
          Last edited by woodburner807; 12-07-2020, 09:32 PM.
          Bill
          Living among knives and fire.

          http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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          • #6
            Appreciate the reply's. I belive I have all but the first of Harley's books and his video. Love the style.

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            • #7
              Carving with large flats like what Refsal does is Scandinavian flat plane carving. I surmise there are other types of flat plane carving. But bottom line is, you're making chips.

              Carve on and enjoy!

              BobL

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              • #8
                Jim said it best, IMO- workingman's style with a workingman's tool. Can of worms comment is accurate too.

                I'll start with a photo- I think this is my best FP to date:
                IMG_1868.jpg

                Now for a more lengthy rambling.

                It's whittling, not carving- piece of wood in one hand, knife in the other, no other tools.
                Subject matter doesn't count. I almost never carve bipeds.
                Belt knife imposes limits on what you can do, fine delicate cuts aren't going to happen.
                Light and shadows are key
                Legs and arms aren't round- they are six or eight sided.
                Planes can be curved, or faceted, but they are not spherical or cylindrical. Hope that makes sense.

                For those who have trouble with FP, maybe you should try a different knife- three inch clip point or similar. Opinel would do, #7 or 8 I think.

                From Harley's Whittling Little Folk book: "..I always try to refrain from carving in too many details. I once read an ancient Chinese wisdom that said the greatest carver makes the fewest cuts." He calls that the difficult art of simplification.

                Don't carve an eye- suggest an eye, or skip the eyes altogether. Shoes don't need laces- in fact, if they weren't at the bottom of a leg you might not know what they are! The only difference between Harley's shoes and bare feet is three or four little vee notches to suggest toes.

                Unfortunately, my written ramblings do not follow Harley's art of simplification...
                Buffalo Bif
                www.bflobif.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Buffalo Bif View Post
                  Jim said it best, IMO- workingman's style with a workingman's tool. Can of worms comment is accurate too.

                  I'll start with a photo- I think this is my best FP to date:
                  IMG_1868.jpg

                  Now for a more lengthy rambling.

                  It's whittling, not carving- piece of wood in one hand, knife in the other, no other tools.
                  Subject matter doesn't count. I almost never carve bipeds.
                  Belt knife imposes limits on what you can do, fine delicate cuts aren't going to happen.
                  Light and shadows are key
                  Legs and arms aren't round- they are six or eight sided.
                  Planes can be curved, or faceted, but they are not spherical or cylindrical. Hope that makes sense.

                  For those who have trouble with FP, maybe you should try a different knife- three inch clip point or similar. Opinel would do, #7 or 8 I think.

                  From Harley's Whittling Little Folk book: "..I always try to refrain from carving in too many details. I once read an ancient Chinese wisdom that said the greatest carver makes the fewest cuts." He calls that the difficult art of simplification.

                  Don't carve an eye- suggest an eye, or skip the eyes altogether. Shoes don't need laces- in fact, if they weren't at the bottom of a leg you might not know what they are! The only difference between Harley's shoes and bare feet is three or four little vee notches to suggest toes.

                  Unfortunately, my written ramblings do not follow Harley's art of simplification...
                  Very good explanation.

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                  • #10
                    I think this is flat plane, but I can't be certain.
                    One slip with the knife, and I know it'll be curtains.

                    You shouldn't try flat plane if you're a bleeder.
                    Take care with your blade; avoid wood that is cedar.

                    While you're in the hospital with multiple cuts.
                    Remember, flat plane is clearly for those who are nuts.


                    IMG_0127.JPG
                    Last edited by Rodster; 12-08-2020, 05:29 PM.
                    Rodster
                    https://rodster.ca

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                    • #11
                      Good one, Rod - and I got a good chuckle from the text!

                      Claude
                      My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                      My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                      My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                      • #12
                        To me, flat plane carving is minimalist carving, in the finished piece your eye sees the detail that is not there. I enjoy seeing flat plane carving, but can't wrap my brain around doing it as "details" get in my way! Harley had it right! "Keep it simple."
                        Last edited by sappy; 12-09-2020, 12:10 PM.

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                        • #13
                          To me, flat plane is just what it says. There are no curves, just multiple planes.
                          just my $.02
                          Steve
                          Steve Reed - Carvin' in the flatlands!
                          My FB page:https://www.facebook.com/stephen.ree...7196480&type=3

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