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Evolution in Woodcarving

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  • joepaulbutler
    replied
    Painting isn't one of my favorite things to do. I use to never do any, but the wife thought I should and then for a while she helped. I agree that some are best shown unpaint or maybe just a few highlights, but fully paint carvings help make some carving, sorry to day

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I'm wallowing in indecision. To paint or not to paint? Do the carvings in pairs. Paint one.

    Some of mine are obvious = Ravens are black with deep violet highlights.
    Most need some paint and some plain wood, it's a color, too.

    Those of you carving birds and looking for accurate paint might look at the Peterson Field Guides, they are all paintings.
    While named paint colors are similar ( eg Payne's Gray, Yellow Ochre, etc) they do vary from one big brand name to another.
    I have 4 different Payne's Gray watercolors. Only one of those (Grumbacher student) is what I'm looking for.

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  • squbrigg
    replied
    Hey Paul, I'm at that stage too, with an Osprey. Now my painting skills come no where close to yours or other fine bird/wildlife carvers here, I am attempting to improve through practice and study. I have the book, "Carving a 1/2 size Osprey and have been reading the chapter on painting, and am so thankful for the authors reference material on paint colours. Being partly colour blind certainly doesn't help, but I rely on my daughter to help and guide me, she is the artist in the family.

    Bob

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  • Just Carving
    replied
    Although my carvings are generally small, I prefer to leave them natural with maybe a highlight here or there. I'm not a big fan of painting. Since I have been doing drawing for a long time, I should try using paint pens or maybe the Rapidograph pens with watered down paint.

    Bob L

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    replied
    Painted vs. unpainted?

    I know before I start a carving whether or not I will paint it. In general: if the carving is basswood, tupelo, laminated, requires mending or has inserts, it will be painted ~ if the carving is any other species of wood, has striking color/markings, is stylized, it will not be painted.

    My wife and daughter-in-law much prefer my unpainted pieces and would be happy if I concentrated totally on them. I like doing both and try to keep some of each in varying stages of finish.

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  • Randy
    replied
    Great trepidation describes how I approach painting most carving Paul. Normally they come out OK but I am never comfortable with the process.
    .

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  • Arthur C.
    replied
    My thought on painting wood carvings is generally the old saying, "Less is more." Better to be subtle in applying color; it's all too easy to overdo it.

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  • Paul_Guraedy
    started a topic Evolution in Woodcarving

    Evolution in Woodcarving

    I have been hacking away at wood ~ in an attempt to produce a worthwhile woodcarving for quite a long time now. A few days ago I came to the realization that I had reached an evolution in carving. I lay no claim to being an artist ~ but my latest piece is on a shelf in front of my recliner. Looking at the peregrine falcon ~ I thought, "The painting is not too bad!" This led to my realizing that I was looking forward to painting the barn owl ~ usually something I approached with great trepidation. .

    I am still only at the "base coat, con sealing" stage ~ but thoroughly enjoying the process. My major regret as I reached the "my traveling days are over" stage of life ~ is that I never made the trip to Idaho to study with Lori Corbett. I am using her instructions in the book, "Illustrated Owl: Barn, Barred & Great Horned: The Ultimate Reference Guide for Bird Lovers, Artists, & Woodcarvers" by Denny Rogers. I do have to translate some of the paints used ~ from acrylic to watercolor. Luckily, long ago, somewhere, I found that Lori Corbett advised, "Pay attention to the pigment information on paints and not the name." This advice has served me well.

    Fortune is smiling! Yesterday, I received my current copy of, "Wild Fowl Carving" and there was an article by Jerry Simchuk on painting a barn owl. Using the information from both Corbett and Simchuk ~ I feel a lot more confident in mixing the colors I need.
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