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What qualities does teak wood possess?

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  • What qualities does teak wood possess?

    Teak wood has a texture that makes it endure and sustain in harsh atmospheric conditions and that is probably what makes it so widely used and known. I am not looking to build wooden furniture sets or tables from scratch but I have decided to get supplies from teak wood texture manufacturers and get furniture made and designed locally. My plan is to actually have a local furniture shop of my own but I know achieving such a goal requires time, commitment and a lot of effort needs to be put in.
    The reason why I am here is to understand the significance of teak wood and why it is said to be both a high-end and durable wood form. I know that teak is expensive and that makes its availability limited as well. You have to research and dig deeper to find reliable suppliers but I am glad that I have shortlisted a few already. I need to be completely sure before I make a purchase, as I do not want any shortcomings in the future. I want to know if teak wood is, in reality, rich in oils and unaffected by humidity or exposure to water.

  • #2
    Where are you? There may be many more suppliers than you have found. Is your "texture" the same as wood anatomy?
    Teak is the real deal, not some Google myth. Great for sailboat decks and green houses.
    Makes great power poles.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      Originally posted by micheallois00 View Post
      I want to know if teak wood is, in reality, rich in oils and unaffected by humidity or exposure to water.
      Live in the rain forest, .....teak is an awesome wood for being outside....but unaffected to exposure.....lets say if not taken care of it will be affected, turn grey, start to dry....and the works. Yes, it is the best wood to use, but like all things, it does need maintenance from both humidity and the sun is another factor. Here in Hawaii expensive wood is getting too expensive and going beyond the price tag of making furniture and prices of the wood even for the rich. We do not have teak here although....all teak pieces of furniture are imported from places like Thailand and etc... and it is cheap even with shipping....that it would not be the money making to import it here. Today we have the world market to consider ....unless your furniture is an artwork worthy of top competitions then you can hit the collector of expensive one of a kind furniture.

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      • #4
        I live in the humid and wet central gulf coast. Teak is used here a lot and like Di said if not maintained it will it will be scrap in a few years. It is also hard on tools. Dulling them quickly.

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        • #5
          Teak is a wood widely used in ship building. It's longevity is famous and it will stand up to the worst conditions the sea can throw at it. It does require maintenance to keep it looking good in marine conditions, but those conditions do not effect the strength of the wood, just the surface look. H.M.S. Trincomalee (38) a British sailing frigate was built in Bombay India in 1815 of teak and is still afloat. She went through a reconstruction a few years ago and they found that 60% of her timbers were still sound. Compare that with U.S.S. Constitution (44) that only has about 5% of her original timbers, or H.M.S. Victory which has 4% of her timbers original. You will find that the majority of yachts trim is teak, for good reason.

          Bob
          Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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          • #6
            Teak was the Deck wood used on battleships in the US Navy. It was easily repaired and spliced with plenty in the deeps of the ship. The Aircraft carriers as well but I'm not sure that continued. I heard the US had Teak forests on islands in the south seas and no longer uses Teak. No active battle ship - the last Dread Naught retired. I suppose the islands were sold or are still maintained. Maybe sources until needed.

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            • #7
              Here's a reference for teak: https://www.wood-database.com/teak/

              Claude
              My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

              My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

              My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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              • #8
                When I lived on an island and we got ships from the South Eastern region we would get it and Mahogany as packing to keep constants from shifting. Scrap at the next stop. The AFRS wood working groups would take a truck (Army) down to the docs and fill it up. More wood for projects. Both woods are carved into figures to beds to anything from houses to caskets. Common wood.

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                • #9
                  i had always heard that the WWII submarines decks were of teakwod. that holds up to the water but also that it is so dense it will not float. as to when the submarine got shattered by a depth charge the teak would not float to the surface as a "tattle-tale"
                  Denny

                  photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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                  • #10
                    Don't know about the sub decks, but teak is around 41 lbs per cubic foot - water is around 64 lbs per cubic foot; therefore, it floats.

                    Claude
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

                    My Pinterest Page: https://www.pinterest.com/cfreaner/

                    My ETSY Shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ClaudesWoodcarving

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                    • #11
                      where was snopes 50 years ago when they were teaching us this stuff in high school ....
                      Denny

                      photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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                      • #12
                        Allow me to translate: at 15% MC, the density runs about 660kg/m^3. Fresh water defines the SI metric system, that's 1,000kg/m^3.
                        If teak doesn't flart, it must float anyway.

                        Some tropical species, such as "Iron-gum" in Australia, have densities of 1.1 to 1.4. Water is 1.0 so those logs sink.
                        The foresters in Asia harvest 2 other "floaters" of junk wood to keep the one good log from sinking.
                        So the forest cover gets logged off 3X faster than you might expect. Outback in OZ, you might get shot for doing that.
                        Brian T

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                        • #13
                          how is it for carving? i occasionally visit woodcrafter store, and they usually have 2 x 2 of teak.
                          Denny

                          photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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                          • #14
                            I'd try a chunk because they carve it all the time in Asia. It might be while wet or if this is dry and hard, soak it and it might open the grain to carve. Hard to tell from afar. I'd try dry simply it won't crack or change shape after carving.

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