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Let's see your carved feathers

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  • Let's see your carved feathers

    I would like to dedicated this topic to people that have carved feathers. I would like to see your work, the wood type you use, and most interested in the final detail the colour you add to the feather.
    Thanks and will be waiting to see the creations.
    Last edited by neb; 02-09-2019, 12:17 PM.

  • #2
    ~ Dwight
    "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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    • #3
      Those are nice and what detail on the feathers. WOW! I like to add a feather to my large carving but wanting to do just one feather so to speak. I started one today not finished yet, but close. The problem I have is how to colour them right to imitate a desired feather colour. I talking mixing colours together etc. to make them look real.
      Keep the coming please I will have more questions. How long did it take you to do one of those birds.
      Thanks

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      • #4
        Excellent bird carvings and it amazes me how detailed they can be done. SUre must take more patience that I have.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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        • #5
          yeah, a good topic for showing. i too would like to know more.. i saw some at a carving show that looked like the real McCoy. here is a pic of my first attempt. basswood, sanded very thin, thin enough i have an air gap in part of it. i put on a coat of BLO after paintin, thinking i shoulda left it alone. this aint the best looking but with more tips i think i can improve. feather.JPG
          Denny

          photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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          • #6
            Looks like a nice carving and very detailed. Can't offer suggestions because I don't carve feathers...but it looks great to me as did the other post was also.
            Bill
            Living among knives and fire.

            http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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            • #7
              drhandrich >>> that looks good. Do you use oil base paint or a water base?

              In my carvings that I do I use natural colour like dirt, bark, scoria, berry etc. for colour in my carving that I do. So when it comes to the art of painting I am totally lost.
              Last edited by neb; 02-09-2019, 09:27 PM.

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              • #8
                i used acrylic, straight out of the bottle, that is , no blending. i thought if i had to duplicate it , straight up is easier. started out with one coat of gesso white.
                wood burned the barbs. if i had started thicker, i coulda put more curl into it. i need to collect a bluejay feather i think. for a study piece.
                mine looks ok to me at the moment but when the rest post theirs i will feel the need to start over again.
                i would like to know how to get a more softer realistic paint to it.
                Denny

                photos at........ http://wiscoden.jimdo.com/

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                • #9
                  I have not posted a photo for awhile so I’ll see if I remember how. I dilute acrylic paint at least by half with water and/or flow medium then paint several coats. I try to make sure that colors run slightly into adjoining colors for a more natural look. I’ve also found that taking a photo of a carving helps me see flaws in carving and painting.
                  Attached Files
                  From Missouri

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                  • #10
                    ^ that is great! You make it look easy very realistic.

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                    • #11
                      IMG_1637.jpgIMG_1636.jpgIMG_1635.jpg
                      Okay, here is one I did yesterday. It was wood from a pallet that was used for wood. I have no idea what kind it was. I would like you to critique the colour.
                      Not the best of pictures but the collouring I used was from dirt mixed with a little water and brushed on. The black is coal and the white was a water coloring paint for kids that you wet the brush and stir around in the hard white colour. I didn't carve or colour one side but carved/dished it out and oiled.
                      Last edited by neb; 02-10-2019, 12:15 PM.

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                      • #12
                        PICT0007-004.JPG Here it a couple that I did years ago. They are out of Basswood and not Painted. I shaded with my Burner and left the Wood do the rest. Maybe give you an Idea on using a Feather without being on a Bird. Merle PICT0005-002.JPG

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                        • #13
                          Beautiful work!

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                          • #14
                            Keep the coming please I will have more questions. How long did it take you to do one of those birds.
                            The first one took about 4 months between carving, painting, making the legs and feet then of course figuring out how to pose the bird.
                            ~ Dwight
                            "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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                            • #15
                              Look at the feathers on the bird wing that Merle posted in #12. Layers of elongate and overlapping 'U'-shapes.
                              A concentric gouge U-shape in the middle of each.

                              That's all I've ever done for the wings of Ravens, 9" - 36" tall.
                              Black paint and the viewer's imagination does it all.

                              The design is a useful marker of non-native carving.
                              Not a part of any of the four basic styles in the Pacific Northwest.
                              Brian T

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