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Let's see your carved feathers

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  • #16
    Recent post in WCI forum of Lynn Doughty feather tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvpKKfC9enc
    drhandrich posted this.

    Tinwood

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    • #17
      While I do not consider myself a "bird carver", I have carved one or two. I am much more comfortable carving waves and sails and sea stuff. My wife had asked me to carve her a Snowy Owl, so I obliged her. A year later it was finished. Feathers..... too many feathers!

      Bob
      Attached Files
      Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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      • #18
        Beautiful! You people are very good, all of you. Thanks

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        • #19
          IMG_1643.jpg
          Here is another one I carved out and would like to duplicate the colour of this wild turkey wing feather.

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          • #20
            What I would do is the base coat in the light color, all over the feather. Make sure it is completely dry before the next step or it will not work. Next, right along the edge of the light color place some water and spread it out all over the light area, then apply a light coat of the dark color coming up against the water. This will pull some of the dark color onto the light color. You will have to repeat this several times. Do not try to make the dark color as dark as the feather in one shot. Try on a scrap piece first, you will get the hang of it. Do not let the water dry without making sure it is spread out or you will get a hard water line, pretty much impossible to hide later. When this is complete dry do it in reverse with the light going into the dark. Repeat the process back and forth until you get a smooth blend between both colors. It should look like one color is fading into the next. Good luck.
            ~ Dwight
            "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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            • #21
              Thanks, I will give that a try. It sounds very interesting not sure I can make it like you described but will try.

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              • #22
                Just be sure to apply "Only" clean water for blending.
                ~ Dwight
                "Hello, I am the Friggin' Happiness Fairy and I just sprinkled happy dust on you, so smile damit' this crap is expensive."

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                • #23
                  Probably not what you meant, but when you said wings this cabinet I built and carved back in 2006 was the first to come to mind. Cabinet holds DVD's, made from curly cherry and curly maple.

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                  • #24
                    Maybe start on paper? Skip the carving part?
                    >Good watercolor paper makes painting easier. 140 lb smooth press.
                    >A good #8 watercolor brush makes painting easier. Maybe a #5 as well.
                    >Good quality watercolor paint (NOT kids' tempra) makes painting easier.
                    Little tubes are sold in open stock, you need earth colors, likely the cheapest.
                    = = =
                    Besides really good brushes, I like to carry a Bateman 6" x 9" sketchbook of 110 lb paper.
                    Any old pencils will do. No eraser. Never back up. One less thing to carry.
                    = = =
                    I think you will get further, faster, rendering the feather colors and patterns on paper first.
                    Plus, watercolors give you far longer "open time" for wet-in-wet blending.
                    No reason not to have 4 or 6 feathers on the "go" at the same time.
                    Explore "dry-brush" on 140 lb not paper.
                    Brian T

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