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  • giving back

    thru the years i dont know how much wood i have gone thru carving, basswod, cherry, birch, oak maplem and walnut, Most of it ended up in the fireplace or as chips and occasionally i ended up with a real carving. a few years ago I thought gee Im using a lot of nature maybe I should repay ya know> so i planted a couple of basswood trees and now im proud to report that the one is probably 20 feet tall anf the other 15. so I would encourage all of you to plant a tree mine were inexpensive and were like popsicles when I got them and told hold and grew wonderfully. so, to ensure a future for thosr coming ehind us plant a tree. thank you

  • #2
    Good idea, Rick - but we have to consider what grows well where we live. Basswood grows too fast in the South, and probably wouldn't survive here in the arid West. Maybe I'll plant a Sequoia Redwood for harvest in a few thousand years.

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    • #3
      Great idea Rick, except not everyone has property with an ability to do that. However, if you can do it...great!
      Bill
      Living among knives and fire.

      http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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      • #4
        Great suggestion Rick.

        Tinwood

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        • #5
          This past spring my sons and I planted 225 trees. From pine to Tulip, persimmon, Northern pecan, Oak and Norway Spruce. We plan to do it every year for the next several years. Have over 25 acres of unused pasture to reclaim.

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          • #6
            I live in a small urban lot- 40x150. The last 40 feet has three huge old maples- 70 feet plus tall. A few years ago I hired a guy to come in and trim them- get rid of the suckers and the deadwood etc.

            I know my maples are near the end of their lifespans. Additionally, the one big nut tree in the neighborhood was taken out recently (horse chestnut) leaving the squirrels to look elsewhere.

            I have a growing walnut now, closer to the house and along the fence, and planted another 5 nuts out near the maples this year. They won't sprout for 12 months, but I'm hoping for one to survive. My contribution to nature, the squirrels, and what I consider to be jewels in my little backyard. I've been know to hug them when no one is looking.

            One does what one can.
            Buffalo Bif
            bflobif.com

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            • #7
              With the help of my grandsons we treed up EED76BA8-04D6-4FE3-AD00-4BA309121AC7.jpeg
              22 trees in the backyard mostly aspen and spruce.
              Ed
              Living in a pile of chips.
              https://m.facebook.com/pg/CentralNeb...ernal&mt_nav=0

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              • #8
                you guys are great seriously

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                • #9
                  I lost three trees in a drought about 10 years ago. I haven't planted any new, but I've allowed a China Berry, an Elm, and a couple of Mesquite trees to grow in the yard rather than mowing them down.

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                  • #10
                    When I moved to my current house, about seven years back, I planted 10 trees. The drought of 2012 took out all the apple seedlings, but the oak, maple, willow, and pear have thrived.

                    "Thrived" may be an understatement on the pear. In the last 30 days I've picked 300 (yes 300!) pears off this single tree. There are still 50 or 60 up near the top.

                    The dehydrator has been running non-stop . . . been slicing, spicing, drying, and giving away
                    My Musical Instrument Website: http://www.ronmarr.com

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                    • #11
                      Don't get me wrong, I like trees and besides without them I'd probably be knitting or quilting instead of carving........... but,...... last Friday Hurricane Dorian tore through this province from one end to the other. Upon it's exit there was approximately 500,000 ( out of a total population of roughly 1 million) people without electricity. It is now Thursday and there are still plenty of folks without power. Most of these power outages were the result of trees falling on power lines.
                      trees are nice, but be careful where you plant 'em......
                      Wayne
                      If you're looking for me, you'll find me in a pile of wood chips somewhere...

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