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  • Gilder
    replied
    You could also seal off the grain completely, so there’s no porosity left, and use a dyed glaze. This can be a little tricky, but it’ll definitely give you even color.

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  • jimp
    replied
    Thanks!
    Jim

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  • papasar
    replied
    Let it dry completely.

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  • jimp
    replied
    Thank you for the advice!
    I haven't tried staining it yet, so I will try the poly suggestion. Stupid question...do you let the 1st coat of poly dry completely before applying the stain?
    The pictures of you folk's work really emphasizes my amateurism! Beautiful works!! I enjoy it though and I think I am getting better. This last project has taught me a lot.
    I will dig out my regular camera and try to get a picture of the plate before I do anything and then after the finish is applied.
    THANKS again, folks for your help!
    Jim

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  • papasar
    replied
    Jim there is a very easy solution as taught to me by my mentor Roger Nancoz. After carving the plate spray it with a light coat of clear satin polyurethane. Don't know the reason but it works that the spray seals the surface but still allows the cuts to absorb the stain. I use gel stains because I can better control the rate of absorption. I apply the stain to a to a few square inches at a time and immediately wipe the stain from the surface of the plate. Let dry and then apply more poly either satin or gloss depending on your choice. If you don't use gel stain then you have to be more aware of the amount of stain that you apply to the cuts because you stand a chance of the stain leeching under the poly surface that you just applied.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by papasar; 01-13-2020, 07:57 AM.

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  • pallin
    replied
    You will have trouble getting a chip carved plate to stain evenly because the carving exposes a lot of end grain that will soak up the stain, and other areas less porous. You could try sealing the plate with a water-based polyacrylic, but it will still be tough.

    Illusion.jpg

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  • jimp
    replied
    Papasar, I can't seem to figure out how to get a picture from my phone to the forum.
    Denny, I think I have some of that in my basement. I wish I would have posted the question before I glued it up. I bet that would have worked. Looked at your website...beautiful work!
    I talked to a supplier earlier today, whom I ordered more plates from, and he said he has had it happen to him, too. His advice was to clamp it as good as you can and pray for the best!
    I will probably just try to scrape up all the glue I can see and put some wood conditioner on it and apply the stain. We will see what happens.
    I'm glad that I'm not depending on my carving to eat and pay pay the bills!
    Thanks, guys.
    Jim

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  • drhandrich
    replied
    i once used a product called "tite chairs" it was designed to fit loose spindles in chairs without dismantling them. it is thin and wicks itself into cracks around the spindles . worked well on loose spindles for me and i used it once where i had a sliver of wood separating on a carve, i let some weep onto the crack ,clamped it with a clothespin , and finished the carve next day. the product shows up with a google search,.

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  • papasar
    replied
    How about a picture?

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  • jimp
    started a topic Forced into an experiment

    Forced into an experiment

    I attempted a chip carved plate. It was probably too advanced for my skill level, really large and deep chips, but I gave it a go anyways. I ended up reasonably satisfied...not ecstatic, but it turned out better than I thought it would.
    My plan was to use a gel stain to finish it. Then it got wet. It bowed... really bad. I let it dry and it straightened out pretty well, but the glue joints had actually separated. I have attempted to force glue into the splits and clamped it together. We will see how the repair goes.
    What do you folks figure my chances are of getting this plate to take a stain finish with any kind of uniformity? Any hints on getting the inevitable thin almost invisible layer of glue off, without getting it wet again?
    I am going to give it a shot because I already have hours into it and it was fun to carve. Even if it ends up a disaster, I (should) learn something.
    Curious as to what experiences any of you may have had and if you were able to salvage your projects.
    Thanks!
    Jim
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