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  • First spoon

    This is my first attempt at a spoon; 12 inch serving/cooking spoon in mahogany, mineral oil finish.

  • #2
    Great for a first effort.
    Now, clone that but 3-4 tines as a fork = salad serving set.
    Brian T

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    • #3
      You can be proud.
      Bill K.
      Every day should be unwrapped like a precious gift.

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      • #4
        A skill I don't have but a very nice carving. I think Brian had a great suggestion and about a salad set. You did it excellently, so keep it up.
        Bill
        Living among knives and fire.

        http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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        • #5
          Thanks all. I did learn this is probably something better done on green wood rather than seasoned hardwood!

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          • #6
            If you can get your hands on green wood, some of it cuts like cheese. Remarkable.
            I wonder about drying and cracking but maybe I'm letting my paranoids hang out.
            A lot of the world carves in seasoned hardwoods. Olive, ebony and mahogany, of course.
            Any flaws in your sharpening process and you get to learn them now, yes?

            What I'd like to carve is a pair of clawed paddles, "bear paws" they are called.
            Used to shred "pulled" pork off a real smoker BBQ.

            Birch is a fairly featureless hardwood from my district.
            Hold good detail and carves well with very fine cuts.
            Brian T

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            • #7
              Brian T If green wood is split into halves before it dries it usually won't check according to the bushcraft carvers.
              There is no problem with tool sharpness, I have a neuropathy that makes it difficult for me to grip the tools for long or to do a lot of detail carving. Carving this seasoned mahogany was very tough on my hands and wrists, I'll be taking a few days break after this spoon to let them recover.

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              • #8
                Just about all of my wood, western red cedar, is split green.
                The texture for carving doesn't change much as it dries.
                A shake block is 24" tall x maybe 12" x maybe 8". 40 lbs wet, 20 lbs dry.
                I anticipate cracking going at least 2" into the ends. The same for a 2" thick birch plank.
                Sometimes, I can get away with carving that and it seems quite stable.
                Other times, a major chunk of the carving falls on the floor.

                Neuropathy. I wish you the best.
                I got a BIG HINT just the other day that my hands ain't what they used to be.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  Most of the bushcraft carvers on the internet are in Europe mainly using birch and similar wood. I don't know much about wood types but maybe the tighter grain of birch behaves better than cedar as it dries. They get some checking but not nearly enough splitting to cause carving issues.

                  The hand issue is a major PIA but I keep working them and it seems to keep them usable. Rather be carving than squeezing rubber balls all day.

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                  • #10
                    Great looking spoon and beautiful wood!

                    If you are having trouble with your hands, here's a pattern for you. This one is in walnut - about 2.5 inches across. The left corner has a 1/4 inch radius, give or take, and the right is 1/2 inch radius, give or take. I have two of these: this one and a 2 inch one in olive. My go-to cooking tools. Just cut it out along the pattern lines on a bandsaw, then round the corners with a sanding drum in a drill press or hand drill. Finished to 400 grit, then run under the faucet and dried with a hair dryer, then lightly re-sanded with a used piece of 400 grit to get rid of the fuzzies. Do this about 3 or 4 times and the final time after drying, it will still be smooth. I finish it with olive oil because I cook with that, and "bake in" the finish as Brian has said. BTW, the one view has a shorter handle because I cropped the end of the photo showing a pair of pliers holding it in an upright position.... I've made these for friends and family in lengths varying from 9 inches to 16 inches. The two different radius corners are to fit different pots - some have a tighter curve in the "corner" of the pot than others.

                    spatula.jpeg
                    Last edited by Claude; 06-04-2020, 04:29 PM.
                    My FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ClaudesWoodCarving/

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                    • #11
                      Nice spoon Squid, what is next on your to do list?

                      Bob
                      Before they slip me over the standing part of the fore sheet, let them pipe: "Up Spirits" one more time.

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                      • #12
                        Give me the chills, reminds of the spoon grandma had to get my attention, well done
                        . . .JoeB

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by squbrigg View Post
                          Nice spoon Squid, what is next on your to do list?

                          Bob
                          I have a partially completed Folk Art Angel sitting on the table.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Claude View Post
                            Great looking spoon and beautiful wood!

                            If you are having trouble with your hands, here's a pattern for you. This one is in walnut - about 2.5 inches across. The left corner has a 1/4 inch radius, give or take, and the right is 1/2 inch radius, give or take. I have two of these: this one and a 2 inch one in olive. My go-to cooking tools. Just cut it out along the pattern lines on a bandsaw, then round the corners with a sanding drum in a drill press or hand drill. Finished to 400 grit, then run under the faucet and dried with a hair dryer, then lightly re-sanded with a used piece of 400 grit to get rid of the fuzzies. Do this about 3 or 4 times and the final time after drying, it will still be smooth. I finish it with olive oil because I cook with that, and "bake in" the finish as Brian has said. BTW, the one view has a shorter handle because I cropped the end of the photo showing a pair of pliers holding it in an upright position.... I've made these for friends and family in lengths varying from 9 inches to 16 inches. The two different radius corners are to fit different pots - some have a tighter curve in the "corner" of the pot than others.

                            spatula.jpeg
                            I like that, probably do it with a knife though, I do have a bandsaw for roughing out the pattern.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Nice job on the spoon. Know what you mean about hands not working too good . I had repetitive strain injury for a lot of years and couldn't play guitar at all. I was lucky and a change of job saw things come right. Hope you can find a fix. Best wishes.

                              Cheers
                              Glenn

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