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What kind of wood filler do you use?

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  • What kind of wood filler do you use?

    Advise what you use.

  • #2
    Are you referring to a filler to fill in voids in wood or a product to use as a smoothing agent on endgrain, for example?
    Arthur

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    • #3
      When I need a non-structural filler I combine fine sanding powder from the wood I'm working and paintable wood glue to make a paste. It blends in much better than any commercial product. If I need something that requires structural strength I use thin superglue.

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      • #4
        We might need some idea of what you are trying to do, since the answer could vary. And if you are going to paint it or not. Most fillers really don't look like wood, so it either becomes a feature or you have to disguise it. I have successfully filled voids and holes and disguised it with paint, even painting fake wood grain to make it look like bare wood. You may need to use gesso or a primer of some type to get paint to cover it well. Super glue and saw dust or baking soda is good for filling small cracks and can be painted if you put a little gesso on it. I use elmers glue and sawdust for some larger areas, but it is difficult to disguise. And I have used epoxy materials, either as a solid stick that is mixed together or two part liquids mixed together. It is easier to paint the stick material. And I have used Bondo, but only if a plan to paint or disguise it in some fashion. I recommend experimenting first on scrap stuff so that you know how it's going to turn out and what it might look like.
        'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

        http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-...61450667252958
        http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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        • #5
          I cannot actually think of a time I have used filler on a woodcarving. It is a subtractive artform, which means you achieve the desired objective by removing wood. If there is a flaw I remove more wood. In a few cases I have added blocks of the wood being carved before proceeding.

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          • #6
            Great if you have perfect wood then do not need a wood filler. Although large works, the wood can have major flaws...which means either trash the work or let the crack, holes, disease part stick out or fill it. I use wood glue and extreme fine sawdust mixed to a thick paste which I use dental tools to jam it into the holes. At times small holes can be filled with super glue and sanded down and repeat until filled. Large holes are filled with epoxy and black pigment on hardwoods. All of it is sanded down and finished.

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            • #7
              Several different products provided that the repaired chip-outs will be covered with paint.
              Carve through the cracks and prepare the wood in the first place to minimize that.

              Insect damage is just a part of the life of the wood as it was a part of a once-living thing, itself.
              I do nothing. Repaired, it will always look like repaired insect damage.
              Brian T

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              • #8
                my go-to product for chip-out and mistakes is "QuikWood", pine color. I certainly like Mike's reply
                . . .JoeB

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                • #9
                  I don't often use carve wood filler. well, sometimes I have to use it. I chose the best option here https://woodyexpert.com/best-wood-filler/ . Maybe you will find a filler for your own purposes. There are a great many of them for different types of wood and different tasks.

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                  • #10
                    Defects I either work around or disguise, however not sure what you want to do. What type of wood?
                    Bill
                    Living among knives and fire.

                    http://www.westernwoodartist.com

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                    • #11
                      My first choice is the us a plug or wedge from the scrap of the wood I am using. If needed I will inlarge the hole of damaged area to take a patch. When I can aline the grain making the patch really blend in. When a patch is not a option I also use a sawdush glue mix.

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                      • #12
                        Looks like Randy and I are on the same page. I would go for a wood patch first. If you are careful you can blend them in by being careful with the grain directions and wood colour. You can cut them to shapes that might blend with the grain to avoid straight lines which the eye will pick up on . Some I've done you are hard pressed to spot even knowing where they are on the piece.

                        another trick is to cut the hole in the work to look like a knot. Then cut a piece of nice tight knot out of another bit of wood and glue it in. It sort of looks like it's meant to be there.

                        If it is a fairy largr piece wood filler can look like a plug of play dough as it has no grain and texture. you can stain a grain pattern onto it with a fine brush to help make it blend in. You would have to be very good at it though for it not to look like a "FIX"

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