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  • #16
    I agree with Steev. It looks like you have created a small secondary bevel on the edge which is too steep to cut. Do what Steev suggested, using the main bevel as your guide, keeping it flat on the sandpaper and then the strop.
    'If it wasn't for caffeine, I wouldn't have any personality at all!"

    http://mikepounders.weebly.com/
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    http://centralarkansaswoodcarvers.blogspot.com/

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    • #17
      OK guys if I correctly understood what you are trying to explain me here is to keep mail bevel flat to my sandpaper/later strop flat on the surface and then make controlled stokes away from blade as we agreed. Now if you be kind enough, main bevel is red or orange mark on the picture you need to zoom to check it ?
      Attached Files
      Last edited by Skob; 09-30-2020, 12:23 PM.

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      • #18
        Agree with Steev and Mike. Secondary bevel too close to cutting edge. You want, at a minimum, to have a continuous bevel from the top of the primary bevel (between the orange and red lines) to the cutting edge. This bevel can be flat or slightly convex, depending on your carving style. I prefer to eliminate the "bump" (top of the primary bevel) all together and make the sides a slightly convex curve from the back of the blade to the cutting edge.... but that's what works for me. I also have a few knives that are nice and flat from the back of the blade to the cutting edge, and works well for carving flat-plane style carvings. The main thing to avoid is making the sides concave. Some beginners have issues with this when using a round wheel, etc. to shape the side of their knifes.
        ....Dave
        Old carvers never die... they just whittle away.
        www.shellknobwoodcarvers.weebly.com

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        • #19
          When I started I had much of the same issue. First I was rolling the blades edge as I picked up the blade at the end of my stroke on the strop. Instead of picking it straight up off the strop. The other thing I did wrong was I put to much pressure on the blade as I moved the blade down the strop. The edge was pressing down in the leather. As I moved down the strop the leather would rise as the edge passed and pressure was released rolling the edge. I had to learn to let the compound and leather do the work. As the blade moved. Pushing the blade down In the leather just dulled the edge. The next thing was the angle of the bevel. A friend and long time carver put a carving edge back on my knife, Then he had me put the blade down on s hard flat surface and hold the edge down flat with my finger tip. Then look at the rise in the back of the blade off the surface. That was the angle I had to learn to hold the knife to keep that edge, both on a stone and strop. Like pallin I have gone from leather strop to using a strip of thin box cardboard from a cereal or cracker box. I like the firmer working surface.
          We live in the land of the free because of the brave!

          https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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          • #20
            Red line. Here is how I would describe.

            Lay the blade flat on sharpening surface cutting edge away from you.

            Rock the back of the blade up until the cutting-edge makes contact with the surface then draw back towards you.

            Stop before you get to the end of the surface.

            Lift fro surface. Flip the blade and repeat going away from you.

            The gap between the back of the blade and the surface will so narrow you would find it difficult to slip a thin coin in there.
            Ed
            Living in a pile of chips.
            https://www.etsy.com/shop/HiddenInWood
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            • #21
              On my Flexcut blade, 6 degrees is not quite the thickness of a dime.
              A beer mat is 10 degrees.
              Brian T

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              • #22
                If the knife is not cutting the wood then you may need to sharpen it. This is the method I use, but there are lots and lots of methods if one does not work for you then you need to find one that does. This is called scary sharp... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SSQ-U6Zu3o

                There are also many videos on Youtube on how to strop your carving knife.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u2sUMkVvW4

                https://www.google.com/search?q=how+...50PEP1IeI8Ac25

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                • #23
                  It occurs to me that asking a question about sharpening here is something like asking directions in a bar. You will learn a lot of ways to get there!
                  We live in the land of the free because of the brave!

                  https://www.pinterest.com/carvingbarn0363/

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                  • #24
                    Having become fed up with trying to determine which compound relates to which grit size and not trusting the color assignments and having my strops become cruddy with waxy old compounds I went to using powdered Aluminum Oxide for everything. I find it cuts very well, leaves a nice polish and is very tidy if applied sparingly with a Q-Tip to a lightly sanded Veg Tan smooth leather strop, mine is about 3/16" thick on a 3/4" ply paddle.

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                    • #25
                      Cleaning a leather strop:
                      Buy a 6" mill file which has teeth/stitching along the edges.
                      Sideways, drag that toothed corner of the file down the strop like a rake.
                      Go easy.
                      It will pick up and even out the blackened honing compound residue.
                      The black is metal, it won't change the cutting character of the CrOx.
                      = = =
                      Many of us don't use leather anymore. The inner surface of convenience food box card is great.
                      Scribble the CrOx stick like a crayon all over it. Stick it down with dabs of masking tape.
                      Gravity is your friend.
                      Toss it and make another is the only maintenance I am willing to do.
                      Actually, I use thinner office filing cards, wrapped around metal tubing, for crooked knives.
                      Brian T

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                      • #26
                        All the carvers I ever taught use auto chrome polish , the stuff in a squeeze tube not the liquid from a can

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                        • #27
                          I made small progress but its not close enough to a knife when it was new.

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                          • #28
                            Think I manage to remove the secondary bevel but its still dull what do you guys think. Hows this possible, this beautiful hobby. Omg i cant believe this is happening, now I have new flexcut detail knife and I am scared to use it cause when it becomes dull I will not be able to make it sharp again. For a moment i thought I got it and figure it, I did everything you explain me, black marker, sandpaper, precise strokes, keep elbowes locked to body, I made strop out of cardboard cereal, green compound is black every thing but my knife is not sharp.
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Skob; 10-02-2020, 06:57 AM.

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                            • #29
                              Here is the strop
                              Attached Files

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                              • #30
                                I remember when I started to golf I was doing just OK, as I got more and more advice my game went into the toilet! I suggest you take one or two of the suggestions from here, no more than two, use a utility knife with the blade extended as far as it will go to approximate the bevel angle of your carving knife and practice. Make only minor adjustments as you go along until you get the hang of it.

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