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Personal Carving Output

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    Brian T
    Senior Member

  • Brian T
    replied
    I can't tell you. If it wasn't for a few pictures, some carvings, I have totally forgotten about. Some turned out to be really quick and easily done, others collect dust. Some got stuck at the drawing stage (this is never going to work!) etc. Some were never finished. How should I estimate those?

    Carving time: Varies from zero per month to 6 hours per day. As usual, hafting a new crooked knife blade is always time well wasted!

    Carving results from 10 sets of drawings and plans (maybe a lot of time in those) :

    Three die.
    Three become the "Living Dead."
    Three finish up well enough for paint.
    One turns out exactly how I imagined it would look.

    I think this saves(?) time:
    I've been trying to do carvings in pairs, two at a time.
    Back and forth from one to the other, I think the technical quality
    of my carving skill improves.

    I'm at a very tedious stage of carving some caterpillar detail on the butterfly story poles. Hour after hour makes a lot of chips on the bench, on the floor and in my clothes. Progress? You would not notice if you looked.



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  • pallin
    Senior Member - Ventura

  • pallin
    replied
    Yes, I recognize the error in taking the starting post and ending post dates as a measure of duration. As I sit here typing, I can see the idle projects on my workbench. If I had an accurate measure of the time spent on a carving project, it would be shocking and perhaps disappointing.

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  • DiLeon
    Senior Member Hawaii

  • DiLeon
    replied
    Originally posted by Tom Ellis View Post
    Phil, It is funny how everyone that looks at a carving, asks how long it took to do it. I have never kept track of how long it takes. Now I just tell them that it took about 20 years, because that is how long it took me to acquire my skills. At one time, I had a clock set up so I could turn it on when I started, and off when I stopped. I seemed to always forget to do one or the other, so gave up on the timing. I just enjoy the experience of each project that I complete.
    Ok Tom second time right at the same time... mind Reading is a superpower that also gives you a type of teleportation.. cut it out... rolling on the floor laughing
    DiLeon
    Senior Member Hawaii
    Last edited by DiLeon; 10-13-2021, 02:29 PM.

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  • DiLeon
    Senior Member Hawaii

  • DiLeon
    replied
    For myself, I do not think about production rate time. Big and hard to do work take major time, other easy ones can be done fast, wood type also has a factor meaning ebony is going take major longer than basswood. Another factor in trying new styles there is the time factor in the learning curve. Plus if the carving is very large compare to the very small has a major factor in time. How much detail is also a factor in production time. Add work that needs full pre-planning. Plus sanding is also a time issue. If I carve the same thing over and over, I can learn to produce that item fast. I tend to lean more toward quality of work vs....how much production. The fact is I really have no idea how much work I have produced at one time I had a portfolio of it which was lost by a PR person. Another time the computer ate my pictures which at the time had no backup... the only thing I really remember is the good work that was created. Plus like you stated those works were not finished and for me a lot of it was destroyed because it was not really that good. There were a few times production rates were an issue because of high demand, but that was when I hired other artists to help...then it comes to point of whose work is it?

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  • Tom Ellis
    chipchaptom. Washington

  • Tom Ellis
    replied
    Phil, It is funny how everyone that looks at a carving, asks how long it took to do it. I have never kept track of how long it takes. Now I just tell them that it took about 20 years, because that is how long it took me to acquire my skills. At one time, I had a clock set up so I could turn it on when I started, and off when I stopped. I seemed to always forget to do one or the other, so gave up on the timing. I just enjoy the experience of each project that I complete.

    Leave a comment:

  • pallin
    Senior Member - Ventura

  • pallin
    started a topic Personal Carving Output

    Personal Carving Output

    Back in 2007 a thread was started about how many carvings each WCI member had produced over time. Here's link if you're curious: Your Current carving number? - Woodcarving Illustrated

    It got me to thinking about the rate of our production - how long does your typical carving take? Of course this depends on the size and complexity of carvings as well as the ability to keep motivated. Carvers who do commissions are a special case.

    Some of the discussions of Works in Progress give us a starting and ending date, so I searched through some of my own projects and found the following: Thirteen relief carvings with durations ranging from 2 weeks to 10 months - average project time: 4.6 months. The longer the project, the more idle time. There are, of course, projects "I never got back to."

    JoePaulButler's recent "Just Carvin'" series is another interesting (and productive) example. How are you doing?
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