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Pear wood spoon help

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  • DiLeon
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    Then, I realized I had to make an apple pie to show off the size.
    FROG PIE 008.jpg
    wow love your pie holder and the apple pie looks delicious.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Besides the textured surfaces, the smooth surfaces got one coat of finish then when that was good and hard, I scrubbed the areas the XXX coarse steel wool which has flat strands. Those act like a thousand chisels and cut off any fuzzies that stick up.

    In most of the spoons and forks that I carved, I did much the same thing to smooth the surface instead of using shreddy sandpapers.

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  • NoDNA
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
    Then, I realized I had to make an apple pie to show off the size.
    FROG PIE 008.jpg
    Brian ! Not fair, Apple pie. And I am hungry t this time and NO pie in sight.. But do like that Frog!!
    Chuck

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Then, I realized I had to make an apple pie to show off the size.
    FROG PIE 008.jpg

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Textured surfaces will cover a multitude of carving sins and mistakes.
    Very common on Poles here in the Pacific North west.
    I wanted this frog platter to have some texture and some really slick skin surfaces, too.
    FROG PIE 005.jpg

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Hi Chuck
    Yeah way too bigger steps in grit size. Pays to sand down through "each" grade until you get all the marks out then go down to the next grade. Just think how good it will look when done. All the pain of getting there just goes away.


    Hi Brian
    I like your fix. Would add a bit of texture to a piece as well.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    Same thing happens when sharpening crooked knives and adze blades = work up through the grits.
    I use 3M Silicon Carbide automotive, wet&dry, fine finishing sandpapers. Can't skip a step.
    I look with 10X to evaluate the edge. Banged up = 600 grit. Not so bad = 800 grit.
    Then 1,000, 1,200, 1,500 and a final honing with CrOx/AlOx.

    Ironically, the best way to avoid sanding altogether is to texture the surface with shallow chip marks.
    Make a horizontal or vertical or diagonal pattern. The #5 sweep gouge looks good to me.
    I can replicate that sweep with many of my crooked knives that allow me to get into corners that a gouge can't cover.

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  • NoDNA
    replied
    Originally posted by Glenn Jennings View Post
    Very nice job !! I like the touch of the hole in the top to hang it up.

    I agree with Di on the sanding method. For some of my stuff I go right down to 2000 grit. But then everyone knows Im a tad crazy, BUT !!boy does that make the grain really pop when the finish goes on.
    Glenn, I am working on a Mahogany project, and I went from50- 350 to 1200 and that was a mistake. Now going back to 500 to start all over through each series, all by hand. Gripper. .And this wood is just my Love too.
    Chuck

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  • Glenn Jennings
    replied
    Very nice job !! I like the touch of the hole in the top to hang it up.

    I agree with Di on the sanding method. For some of my stuff I go right down to 2000 grit. But then everyone knows Im a tad crazy, BUT !!boy does that make the grain really pop when the finish goes on.

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  • yolli
    replied
    Your spoon turned up great.

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  • Gulf Coast Handyman
    replied
    Originally posted by TjdsWorkshop View Post
    Spoon is complete. Thanks to everyone for their advice. Especially Claude and Brian T.
    Great job Brian!

    Dave

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  • TjdsWorkshop
    replied
    Spoon is complete. Thanks to everyone for their advice. Especially Claude and Brian T.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 2 photos.

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  • Brian T
    replied
    I carved 70 spoons in good, hard, seasoned birch. Oven-baked olive oil finish.
    The fastest tool to use was a Pfeil 9/15 gouge, the usual 20* bevel.
    Final touch with a crooked knife. Kestrel 'C' bend.
    Nobody sees the tool marks under the gravy.

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  • bowinhand
    replied
    Okay here is another tip. Let the spoon sit and dry a day or two. Strop your tools again and take light finish cuts. Burnish with a smooth stone or wood. Sand paper leaves small scratches where tool cuts don't. Small scraper also work well.

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  • Claude
    replied
    If you have a Dremel or a Harbor Freight knock-off, get a 1/2 inch diameter ball (sphere) bit for doing the inside of the bowl. Just make sure you hold the tool so the rotation is always towards the center of the bowl so the burr won't catch and tear off a chunk of the edge.

    Claude

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