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Now this is what I call woodcarving!!!!!!!!

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  • Now this is what I call woodcarving!!!!!!!!

    It never gets old marveling at the abilities of Thai carpenters. I'd love to be able to take a trip to Pattaya, Thailand to see this work in progress. When I look at it I compare my own carving ability to an 8-year old with a bar of soap.

    The Sanctuary Of Truth

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=em_U...=GreatBigStory


  • #2
    Holy smokes, some people have a lot, lots , lots of time on their hands, unbelievable
    . . .JoeB

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    • #3
      Sure is some wood carving I bet it took a while
      Herb

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      • #4
        Originally posted by uvawyo View Post
        Sure is some wood carving I bet it took a while
        And according to what I've read it's not finished yet.

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        • #5
          Do you have any Idea how long they have been working on it. It looks like it would take a couple of generations of carvers to achieve it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Glenn Jennings View Post
            Do you have any Idea how long they have been working on it. It looks like it would take a couple of generations of carvers to achieve it.
            Sanctuary of Truth

            From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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            Main Entrance

            Upper part of the temple near

            The Sanctuary of Truth (Thai: ปราสาทสัจธรรม) is an unfinished museum in Pattaya, Thailand, which is a hybrid of temple and castle based on Ayutthaya period and Buddhist, Hindu beliefs. It was designed by the Thai businessman Lek Viriyaphan[1] in the Ayutthaya style. The building is notably constructed entirely out of wood, specifically Mai Deang, Mai Takien, Mai Panchaat, and Teak, and it contains only wood-carved idols and sculptures. Construction first began on the Sanctuary of Truth in 1981 and continues as of 2020, though visitors are permitted inside with hard hats. Located on 13 hectares of land, the temple houses an internal space of 2,115 m2, with the tallest spire reaching to 105 m.[2]

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            • #7
              Wow,yes Sir that's definitely Woodcarving.
              Mark N. Akers
              My Etsy Store: https://www.etsy.com/shop/KarolinaKarver

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              • #8
                Very intense sunlight and monsoon rains in the tropics there.
                I'd like to know what they use on the wood exposed to the elements.
                Brian T

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                • #9
                  Very impressive, and the scope of the work is unfathomable. To me, it would be impossible to appreciate the work of a single piece because my eyes would be bouncing around from place to place. To much detail for this old brain to assimilate.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Brian T View Post
                    Very intense sunlight and monsoon rains in the tropics there.
                    I'd like to know what they use on the wood exposed to the elements.
                    Brian..... I don't know that answer for sure but I do know that the Thai's do spend a lot of time and effort into maintaining and preserving places sacred to them. First and foremost I would imagine that a structure like this is built of teak which is a regulated industry in Thailand. Only trees grown on plantations can be harvested for commercial use. Teak, as I'm sure you know, is in itself is a valued wood world wide for furniture and exterior applications like decking in the boating industry. However, Teak will turn gray over time and stains and oil sealers are used. Thailand, being an emerging third world country recycles and reuses probably way more than we do here in the US. I would imagine that their oil sealers don't generally come from manufacturers like Sherwin Williams or Valspar but are regionally homemade right there in Thailand from used oil sources.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sappy View Post
                      Very impressive, and the scope of the work is unfathomable. To me, it would be impossible to appreciate the work of a single piece because my eyes would be bouncing around from place to place. To much detail for this old brain to assimilate.
                      During the mid to late 60's I was treated to a free southeast Asia tour by Uncle Sam! Ha! Ha! We port called in Thailand three times. Twice in Bangkok and once in Sattahip. And somehow, prior to doing some heavy sampling of their local brews I managed to visit a couple of Buddhist Temples and your comment is exactly how I felt. Everywhere you looked the detail, opulence, and grandeur was totally overwhelming. https://www.google.com/maps/uv?pb=!1...zsQoip6BAhnEAM

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                      • #12
                        amazing work. Pretty mind blowing!!!

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